The Railways of Ottawa

Findings of the Circle 
Finding no. 6 
Interlockings and Signal Cabins in the Ottawa Area
- Arnprior, OA&PS/GT/CNR-CPR
- Bedell, CPR
- Brockville, CNR-CPR-VIA
- Brockville, Brockville Moulding Sand Company siding, GTR
- Carleton Place, CPR
- Casselman, Pilon's siding GTR
- Cornwall, O&NY/NYC-GTR/CNR
- Cornwall, O&NY/NYC-CSLR
- Cornwall Junction CPR-GTR/CNR
- Coteau, CNR
- De Beaujeu, CPR-CAR/GTR/CNR
- Fassett, Salmon River and Northern Railway
- Finch, CPR- O&NY/NYC
- Forfar, CNoR/CNR-BWSSM/CNR
- Glen Tay, CPR
- Hammond, CAR/GTR/CNR-CPR
- Harrowsmith, K&P/CPR-CNoR/CNR
- Hawkesbury, CNOR-GTR
- Hull, CPR-Hull Electric
- Kingston, Montreal Street, K&P/CPR-KP&C
- Ottawa, Broad Street, CAR/GTR/CNR-OER
- Ottawa, Campbell's siding, CPR-GTR/CNR
- Ottawa, Central Depot, CAR-OER
- Ottawa, Central, Union Station, CPR-Hull Electric
- Ottawa, CTC Panels
- Ottawa, Deep Cut
- Ottawa, CPR Dows Lake (see section 2.4)
- Ottawa, Elgin Street (Tower) CAR
- Ottawa, Ellwood Diamond
- Ottawa, Hawthorne CAR-NYC
- Ottawa, Hurdman CPR-CAR/GTR/CNR-NYC
- Ottawa Junction, CNOR-CPR
- Ottawa, Laurier Avenue/Maria Street CAR
- Ottawa, Main Street, OA&PS
- Ottawa, Nepean Junction cabin,CNR
- Ottawa, Queen Street West/Fleet Street OER-CAR/GTR/CNR
- Ottawa, Rideau Canal drawbridge
- Ottawa, Riverside CNR
- Ottawa, Walkley Diamond
- Renfrew Junction, K&P/CPR - OAPS/GTR/CNR
- Rockland, CNOR-GTR
- Smiths Falls, CPR-CNR
- Smiths Falls, CNoR bridge over the Rideau Canal
- Tichborne, K&P/CPR-CLO&WR/CPR
- Vankleek Hill, CPR-CAR/GT/CNR



Arnprior, OA&PS/GT/CNR-CPR 

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 21 March 1893
Approves plan and profile showing proposed crossing by the OA&PSR of the CPR at Arnprior. Shows a crossing of a Mill Spur south from the CP across the OA&PS west of the Madawaska River.

In February 2020 Brian Gilhuly writes
The very first Privy Council order (1893-03-21) is very confusing when it refers to a "crossing of a Mill Spur south from the CP across the OA&PS west of the Madawaska River".
There were no mill spurs south from the CPR east or west of the Madawaska, because there were no mills south of the CPR. Also, east of the diamond the CPR is south of the OA&PS, so a southerly spur would not require a crossing..
East of the Madawaska, the CPR spur running north to the McLachlin mills was crossed by the OA&PS main line on a bridge, but that is the exact opposite of what is described.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 27 May 1893

Authorizes the crossing of the Canadian Pacific Ry. by the Ottawa, Arnprior and Parry Sound Railway at Arnprior

Ottawa Citizen 22 August 1893 ... A signal tower is being erected at the junction of the Parry Sound and Canadian Pacific railroads in the western part of town.

Ottawa Citizen 22 August 1893 Mr. G.A. Mountain, chief engineer of the Canada Atlantic Ry. was in the city yesterday after spending a considerable amount of time superintending the work under construction on the Ottawa, Arnprior and Parry Sound Railway. Mr. Mountain states that the work is proceeding very satisfactorily. The bridge over the Madawaska river at Arnprior will be completed today and the ballasting on the eastern division on Saturday. An interlocking system at the crossing of the tracks of the C.P.R. is being placed at Arnprior.
 
Ottawa Journal 26 August 1893 The signal tower at the crossing of the O.A. & P.S. and C.P.R. at Arnprior is nearly finished. It is to be in charge of two men, one appointed by the C.P.R and the other by the O.A. & P.S.

Renfrew Mercury 1 September 1893 The signal tower at the intersection of the C.P.R. and Parry Sound railways in the Harrington section of Arnprior, is now being erected.

Ottawa Citizen 20 September 1893 On Sunday last a gang of workmen put in the Diamond crossing for the Parry Sound road over the C.P.R. at this point. As the grading is nearly done below here and Renfrew, the track laying will be pushed forward without delay.


Board of Railway Commissioners order 23250 of 1 February 1915
Application by Gillies Brothers of Braeside (3.2 miles west of Arnprior) and George Baker of Arnprior (his plant is located one mile from GTR) for the construction of an interchange track between CPR and GTR at Arnprior.  Both companies are at a disadvantage in shipping to points on the GTR.  Only company in Arnprior with a private siding is the McLachlin Brothers Lumber Co which already has connection to both railways.  GTR agreeable to the connection but CPR is not.  Ordered that an interchange should be put in and costs should be borne equally by GTR and Gillies.  Costs of maintenance and protection, if any, to be borne by GTR.  To be completed by 1 May 1915.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 24415 of 8 November 1915
(1) Approves the proposed interchange tracks at Arnprior ordered by 23250, a semaphore to be erected west of the CPR switch, at a point to be indicated by the CPR, at the cost of the GTR.
(2) GTR authorized to construct the tracks across road allowance between lots 5 & 6; Charlotte Steet (unopened); Norma Street; Ida Street (unopened); Vancourtland Street and McLachlin Street.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 25289 of 17 August 1916
Approves plan showing changes to the interlocking at Arnprior.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 35904 of  15 December 1924
There is no night traffic on the CNR and so long as the character of the movements shown to exist continues CNR and CPR are relieved from maintaining a signalman between the hours of 18:00 and 09:15 daily excepts Sundays and all day on Sundays; the home signals and derails to be set clear for the CPR and the key to the tower to be left in the custody of the CNR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 36072 of 7 February 1925
Application by Gillies Bros for an interchange with CNR.  Gillies is located at Braeside, 3 miles west of Arnprior.  The eastern end of the yard is 5800 feet from the diamond with CNR.  Dochert Brick Tile and Terra Cotta Works filed a consent to the transfer of their application to the site now proposed.  Interchange tracks ordered by 23250 had not been put in because of the expense, land acquisition, installation of tracks etc. Proposal now was for a public interchange 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 miles from the point ordered under 23250 and would use a siding owned by McLachlin Bros.  CN supported this and offered to contribute to the cost. Board felt that the interchange would not be used (nothing has happened for 9 years) and is not justified.  Aplication denied.


Sept. 11, 1929, though it has a note which says “COPY OF PLAN SUBMITTED TO BRC AUG 31ST 1915”
Courtesy of Arnprior and McNab/Braeside Archives, 1993-0005 M042 (alt.)

The following three 1929 aerial photos are provided by Malcolm Vant who made the annotations

Location of future interchange tracks


Shows the diamond


Shows stations

Brian Gilhuly writes (March 2020)
The 1929 CNR plan for the interchange showed three interchange sidings. While I haven’t found anything from the 1930s to confirm the as-built layout, I did come across in the archives a large-scale (1:2000) topo map created by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources in 1981 (detail attached) that confirms there were only two sidings at that date.  CN Rideau Area ETTs from the 1960s give the interchange capacity as ten cars, which seems about right for the two tracks on the map. I suspect that there never was a third track.

Arnprior and McNab/Braeside Archives  1994-0021-M050 (detail)


Detail from a 1926 aerial photo that shows the signal cabin before the nearby buildings were erected.

Raymond Farand writes (March 2020)
Further to the information provide by Brian, I've had it confirmed that the main interchange track, which diverged from the subdivision track at mileage 26.78, was designated in the late '80s as WR35 and was 1404 feet in length.  The secondary interchange track, which was used as a run-around track, was designated as WR36 and was 1010 feet in length.  At some point, before the portion of the Renfrew Subdivision was abandoned west of mileage 25.7, the secondary interchange track was removed leaving only the main interchange track in service.  I was not able to confirm that the 1404 foot figure represents the entire distance from the subdivision turnout to the connection with the Chalk River Sub west of Division Street, but after doing some map scaling, I would say that it does represent the entire distance at least up to the CPR property line likely near a derail location.  I don't have anything to add vis-a-vis the existence of a third track.
In case my wording was misleading I just want to clarify that the track designations were in effect in the late ‘80s. They were applied at an earlier point in time possibly when car control became computerized.


Judgment of 13 November 1930
Application by the town of Arnprior for an order directing that an interchange be constructed between CNR and CPR at Arnprior.  The Board is normally ambivalent as to which railway gets the traffic but there may be some times in the development of towns wherein a railway which is senior has been followed by a junior road, and difficulties in marketing the output of industries lying along the junior road present themselves because of the lack of interchange between the two railways.  It is in the public interest that an interchange be constructed and an order will issue.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 45769 of 14 November 1930
Following application by town of Arnprior, CNR authorized to construct an interchange track with CPR at Arnprior.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 45987 of 12 December 1930
CNR authorized to construct an interchange track at Arnprior across Ida street (unopened), Norma street, Charlotte street (unopened), and the road allowance between lots 5 and 6 on the line between the town of Arnprior and the township of McNab.  This interchange was required to be constructed under 45769.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 46242 of 6 February 1931
Pending the installation of proposed new interlocking plant, CNR authorized to discontinue the use of the east derail on their line and connect the switch, leading from the main line to the interchange track, with the interlocking plant; to erect a stop sign 50' east of the said switch; and later to move the home signal to the same position and connect it with the interlocking plant.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 46250 of 6 February 1931
CNR and CPR given authority to operate their trains over the interchange tracks at Arnprior.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 46939 of 27 June 1931
CNR authorized to reconstruct the interlocking plant and to replace same with an automatic interlocking plant consisting of home and distant signals, without derails, the question of installation of derails to be reserved for further consideration.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 47290 of 31 August 1931
46939 amended by striking out the words "the question of the installation of derails at the said crossing to be reserved for further consideration".

Board of Railway Commissioners order 48546 of 2 May 1932
Cost of constructing interchange at Arnprior to be apportioned 90% to CNR and 10% to CPR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 49077 of 28 September 1932
Cost of maintenance of interchange at Arnprior to be apportioned 90% to CNR and 10% to CPR.

Board of Transport Commissioners order  61306 of  4 October 1941
Authorizes CNR to make alterations to the signal protection at the crossing of the Renfrew subdivision over the CPR at Arnprior.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 64079 of 12 October 1943
Authorizes CPR to operate trains over crossing of CNR at Arnprior at a speed not exceeding 50 mph.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 67830 of 29 August 1946
Approves plan showing proposed changes in signal protection at the crossing of the highway (sic) and CNR at Arnprior. This relates to the crossing with the CPR. Provided that the speed of all CNR trains, when approaching and when within 500' of the governing signal, be restricted to a speed not exceeding 10 mph.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 67859 of  9 September 1946
Amends 67830 to delete reference to highway and insert reference to crossing with CPR.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 68318 of  17 December 1946
Authorizes CNR and CPR to operate their trains through the interlocking plant at the crossing of the railways at Arnprior.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 89167 of 5 July 1956
Approves revised plan showing protection as installed at Arnprior at the crossing of CNR and CPR.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-25794 of  17 November 1977
CNR authorized to make changes to the interlocking.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-26896 of  30 May 1978
(1) CNR authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking by first bringing the trains to a stop, then to be governed by the indications after pressing the push buttons;
(2) CPR is authorized to operate its trains through the interlocking without their first being brought to a stop providing that the signals are in the PROCEED position.



CN locomotive 2601 working the Arnprior Interchange Matt-0770  


A CNR passenger train on the diamond in 1959. The interlocking shed is on the right.   Matt-7357


CPR snowplow on the diamond with CNR in 1958. Matt-7037

David Jeanes comments (February 2020):
I guess this must be the Barry's Bay train with steam generator, baggage-mail, combine and coach in 1959. Substantial compared to the single RDC-3, (baggage-mail-48 passengers), in MATT-0805 in 1961.
Interesting that the eastbound CN home signal is only about 200 feet from the diamond, like the westbound signal, rather than the 500 feet originally required. The automatic interlocking did not have derails.
One boxcar on the interchange track. The comment was made by Tony Humphrey that there was room for 3 cars between the interchange switch and the signal. So the boxcar in MATT-0770 was still on the main, while 2601 picked up the gondola.

Bruce Chapman writes (February 2020)
When I was dispatching in the last century 1969-1974 in Smiths Falls, the Arnprior interchange was used by CP for dropping off mostly open-topped boxcars loaded with shavings and chips from the Gillies Brothers plant in Braeside for CNR furtherance.
 I never did find out where they went, but often if I was working days on Saturday, the car control in Walkley Yard would call me up with the car numbers that had to be lifted at Braeside for Anrprior; they were all in the 855xxx series; the list would be given to #72 by the operator at Renfrew.
 And westward cars off the CNR at Arnprior to be lifted by CP would be given to the operator at either Carleton Place, or usually Smiths Falls before the west wayfreight left on Monday, Wednesday and Friday; this would have been after the CP operator at Arnprior would have been cut off.
 And if the CN guy was late, long after the west wayfreight had left Carleton Place,  there was a telephone box on the aluminum interlocking relay box at the crossing that you can see in the pic of the snowplow passing the crossover.
 The CN conductor would leave the waybills and any switching instructions in the phone box.


Brockville CNR-CPR-VIA

Canadian Transport Commission order R-37986 of 15 April 1985
CNR, CPR and VIA authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking at the junstion of the connecting track at m. 125.72 Kingston sub. which connects with the CPR Brockville sub. at m. 27.60 without first being brought to a STOP provided the signals are in the PROCEED position



Brockville, Brockville Moulding Sand Company siding, GTR 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 28804 of 12 September 1919
GTR ordered to install a siding into Mrs. Bressee's farm two miles west of Brockville to serve the Brockville Moulding Sand Company.  Connection to be interlocked with signals 1,000 feet either side on the main line. Mile 127.64

Board of Railway Commissioners order 29769 of 21 June 1920
Rescinds order 28804.



 
Carleton Place, CPR  

Photo by Bill Linley 19 January 1988

From Bruce Chapman: Carleton Place Saturday night was a toughie.  Normally the freight train #82 ran south from Ottawa West to Bedell then west to Smiths Falls.  Saturday this train would run via Carleton Place, then south to Smiths Falls. He would have hot traffic for Western Canada which connected with transcontinental freight #949. This freight train in the Carleton Place subdivision would run as #83, and we hoped that Ottawa West would get him out in good time. #83 would cut off his power and the hot western Canada traffic at Carleton Place, run around the south wye and tuck himself into an old siding called Paul, south of Carleton Place and wait for #949. Now if #949 was by Franktown, 10 miles south of Carleton Place, we'd have an awful time trying to get #83 into clear so #949 could lift the traffic, as there were no signals towards Smiths Falls.  There had been in the 1950s, but as traffic dwindled, the interlocking was cut back. And another problem was the train dispatcher in Smiths Falls named Gerry O'Neill - what a pest. However, we did the best we could with this old interocking arrangement. At Carleton Place, we sold passenger tickets. There was a train order signal on the Chalk River subdivision, about 2000 feet west of the station, but if we had to hoop a train over there, either they stopped their train over there and came into the station for orders, or if we had a car we'd drive over the the main street crossing and hoop up the orders if it was a hot train. The Carleton Place subdivision from Ottawa to Carleton Place was dark territory, the Chalk was ABS.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 67064 of 26 February 1946
Approves proposed interlocking of all junction switches at Carleton Place.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 67529 of  21 June 1946
Approves plan showing proposed changes to interlocking plant at Carleton Place

Board of Transport Commissioners order 68885 of 30 April 1947
CPR authorized to operate its trains through the interlocking plant at Carleton Place, "without their first being brought to a stop:  PROVIDED the signals are in the "proceed" position".

Board of Transport Commissioners order 69013 of 26 May 1947

Approves revised plan showing changes in interlocking plant at crossing of CPR, m. 17.1. Chalk River sub.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-20227 of 6 March 1975
CPR authorized to make track and signal changes including conversion of the interlocking at Carleton Place to automatic block signal operation between m. 14 and m. 27.


Casselman, Alexandria sub.  GTR Pilon's Siding

Board of Railway Commissioners order 4262 of  19 December 1907
Application by Alexander Pilon of Casselman for an order directing the Canada Atlantic Railway to construct a branch line (about 340 feet long) in a northerly direction from a point about three miles west of Casselman for the applicants Brick Manufacturing Industry.  Applicant to provide the right of way.  Spring frog and split point switch to be installed on the main line protected by semaphores and interlocked with the switch.  Hayes derail to be installed in the siding also to be interlocked with the switch. Applicant to pay half yearly amount equal to 6% of the value of the materials in the spur and applicant to pay cost of installation.  CAR to give a refund of $2 per car shipped. Applicant bear the cost of all renewals, repairs and maintenance.  Applicant to protect the CAR from animals escaping on to the railway. CAR authorized to collect, in addition to the regular tariff, an additinal sum to cover cost of handling the traffic to and from the siding.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 5390 of 13 August 1908
Dismisses application by Alexander Pilon of Casselman for an order fixing the additional sum to be charged by CAR under 4262 for switching and handling traffic to and from siding mentioned in the order.  It is confirmed that the additional charge of $3.00 per car for switching and handling of traffic at the siding between South Indian and Casselman is deemed to be a reasonable charge.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 29195 of 30 December 1919
GTR is authorized to remove Pilon's siding 3 miles west of Casselman.


Cornwall - O&NY/NYC-CSLR

Board of Transport Commissioners order 62748 of 22 September 1942
(1) Authorizes Cornwall Street Railway, Light & Power Co. to construct its railway across two tracks of the Ottawa & New York Ry. at rail level;
(2) Approves interlocking;
(3) Ottawa & New York Ry. trains and CSRL&P trains to come to a stop and be flagged over the crossing until the interlocking has been installed and approved.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 63350 of 17 March 1943

(1) Authorizes Ottawa & New York Ry. to operate its trains through interlocking plant at crossing of Cornwall St. Ry. without their first being brought to a stop;
(2) CSRL&P authorized to operate its trains through the interlocking after bringing them to a stop at the home signals and on receiving a "proceed" signal;
(3) 15 mph speed limit on Ottawa & New York Ry. trains when approaching the crossing when within 500' of the governing home signal.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 95046 of  29 July 1958
CNR authorized to remove the interlocker at the crossing with the NYC and the Cornwall Street Railway Light and Power Co., which was authorized by 62748, and install a stop sign on each approach to the said crossing.


Cornwall G&SR/CPR-GTR/CNR

Board of Railway Commissioners order 22325 of 1 August 1914
Glengarry & Stormont Railway authorized to construct its railway across the GTR near Cornwall. 
(1) G&SR, at its own expense and under the supervision of a GTR engineer, to insert a diamond in the GTR;
(2) Crossing to be protected by an interlocking plant, derails to be placed on the lines of both companies, on each side of the crossing, derails to be interlocked with the signals;
(3) Normal position of signals on both lines to be at "Danger", in the movement of trains of the same or of a superior class over the crossing, the trains of the GTR shall have priority;
(4) Plans to be filed with the BRC;
(5) Man or men in charge of the interlocking plant shall be appointed by GTR; (6) G&SR to bear the cost of providing, maintaining and operating the interlocking.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 22325 of  20 March 1915
G&SR and GTR authorized to operate their trains over the crossing without their being brought to a stop.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 31246  of 8 July 1921
22325 amended to allow G&SR to appoint the man in charge of the interlocking.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 33148 of  22 November 1922
CPR authorized to close down the interlocking plant as follows: 16:00 Mon to 08:00 Tues; 16:00 Tues to 08:00 Wed; 22:00 Wed to 08:00 Thurs; 16:00 Thurs to 08:00 Fri; 16:00 Fri to 08:00 Sat; 16:00 Sat to 08:00 Mon. Signals and derails to be set clear for the GTR; key to the tower to be left in the custody of the CPR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 35725 of 28 October 1924
Authorizes changes to interlocking plant by changing the wire operated distant signal to a fixed arm signal.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 40862 of 6 June 1928
Authorizes changes to interlocking plant.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 66289 of 24 July 1945
Authorizes CNR to operate their passenger trains over crossing with CPR at m. 67 Cornwall subdivision

Board of Transport Commissioners order 67961 of 28 September 1946
Authorizes CNR to construct additional track across Glengarry & Stormont Railway, m. 26.6 Cornwall subdivision and to cross Marlborough Street and Nine Mile Road and join with the CSR.  This was done for the CSR and was completely electrified.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 68228 of 29 November 1946
Authorizes CNR to operate their trains through the interlocking at Cornwall, m. 26.6 Cornwall subdivision.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 68794 of 8 April 1947
Authorizes CNR to construct extension to interchange track across road allowance between lots 12 & 13, concession 1, Cornwall Twp.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 69626 of  18 october 1947
Authorizes CNR and CPR to operate through the interlocking plant near Cornwall without stopping

Board of Transport Commissioners order 68714 of  5 November 1947
Amends wording of 69626.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 73308 of 25 October 1949
Approves revised plan showing changes in interlocking at CNR crossing near Cornwall, m. 26.6, Cornwall subdivision.  CPR eastbound trains to maintain a speed of 5 mph when approaching the crossing.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 73670 of 20 Decembvber 1949
All changes in and to the interlocking plant approved by 22325, 35725 and 40862 which are required by the construction of additional trackage as authorized by 67961 shall be paid by CNR.  CSR acted as switching carrier for CNR, CPR and NYC.  New track was constructed in the CNR right of way where it crossed CPR whereupon it left the right of way and went south to join the CSR.  In this way it crossed the CPR not where it was junior within the CNR right of way

Board of Transport Commissioners order 80544 of  6 June 1953
CPR authorized to construct, within 6 months, a portion of railway (interchange track) as relocated to east half of lot 5; and branch line (interchange track) in the east half of lot 5 and west half of lot 4 and to connect the said branch lines with the Cornwall SRL&P in east half of lot 5 and west half of lot 4, all in conc. 1, Cornwall twp.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 82275 of 1 October 1953
Authorizes CPR to make changes to the signals at the interlocking at the crossing with CNR (m. 26.54) at Cornwall.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 88771 of 10 May 1956
Authorizes CNR to install temporary signalling for the diamond crossing of the proposed diversion of their main line, Cornwall subdivision, and the CPR near Cornwall.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 89363 of  1 August 1956
Authorizes CNR & CPR to operate over the diamond crossing of their railways near Cornwall provided all trains are first brought to a stop at the stop signs and do not proceed until the proper signal has been given for the train to move over the crossing.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 92068 of 16 July 1957
(1) CNR and CPR authorized to operate their trains through the interlocker at the crossing near Cornwall without their first being brought to a stop provided the signals are in the proceed position;
(2) No eastward train of the CPR shall exceed a speed of 10 mph when it is passing the governing approach signal.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 92529 of  19 September 1957
Authorizes CPR to remove the interlocking facilities at the crossing of its railway and the CNR at m. 26.6 and to install stop boards

Board of Transport Commissioners order 124711 of  15 June 1967
Authorizes CNR to make changes to the signals at the Cornwall interlocking with CPR between m. 63 and m. 69

Canadian Transport Commission order R-2299 of 13 May 1968
CNR authorized to operate turbo trains at a speed of 95 mph., conventional passenger trains at a speed of 90 mph. and freight trains at a speed of 60 mph. over the diamond crossings with the CPR at m. 66.61 east of Cornwall.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-12093 of  6 July 1971
CNR authorized to make changes to the signals at the interlocking.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-13078 of  24 November 1971
(1) CNR and CPR authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking (at m. 26.10) without their first being brought to a stop provided the signals are in the proceed position.  
(2) No eastward train of the CPR shall exceed 10 mph when it is passing the governing approach signal.


Cornwall Junction O&NY/NYC-GTR/CNR

Railway and Shipping World September 1899
Interlocking plants are being put in at the crossing of the O&NY of the GT tracks at Cornwall and also at the crossing of the GT tracks at Helena, NY on the Rouses Point branch. (official).

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 23 September 1898
Ottawa and New York Ry. given approval to cross Grand Trunk Ry. 1 1/2 miles west of town of Cornwall.  Ottawa & New York Ry., at its own cost, to provide, construct and maintain the interlocking, signals and derailing appliances pursuant to an agreement between O & NY and GTR dated 9 May 1898.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 5079 of 17 June 1908
Ottawa & New York Ry. and GTR ordered to agree on joint tariffs for freight traffic interchanged at or near Cornwall which originates on or is destined to local points on the Ottawa & New York Ry..  This will replace the joint tariffs cancelled by the GTR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 22661 of 2 October 1914
Approves the revised arrangement of the interlocking plant at the crossing of the GTR and the Ontario & Western Railway (sic) at Cornwall Junction.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 22722 of  19 October 1914

22661 amended by striking out "Ontario and Western" and replace with "Ontario and New York".

Board of Railway Commissioners order 42620 of 16 May 1929
So long as the character of the crossing shown to exist continues, NYC relieved from maintaining a signalman to operate the crossing between 23:00 and 07:00 daily; the home signals and derails to be set clear for movements on the CNR and at stop for movements on the NYC.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 43539 of 7 October 1929
So long as the character of movements over the crossing shown to exist continues, NYC is relieved from maintaining a signalman to operate the crossing on Sundays; home signals and derails to be set clear for movements on the CNR and at stop for the movements on the NYC.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 48690 of  31 May 1932
(1) rescinds 42620 and 43539:
(2) Provided the character of of the movements over the crossing shown to exist continues, NYC is relieved from maintaining signalmen to operate the interlocking plant from 18:40 to 08:40 daily and from 08:40 to 18:40 on Sundays on condition that the signals be set clear for movements on the CNR and "stop" for movements on the NYC during the hours when the signalmen are off duty.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 66504 of 24 September 1945

Authorizes CNR and NYC to operate their trains through the interlocking plant at crossing with NYC at Cornwall Junction

Board of Transport Commissioners order 71088 of 23 August 1948
Authorizes CNR to operate trains at a speed not exceeding fifty mph. through the interlocking plant at Cornwall Junction.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 89195 of  11 July 1956
CNR authorized to install temporary signalling for the diamond crossing with the NYC.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 89362 of  1 August 1956
Authorizes CNR & NYC to operate over the diamond crossing of their railways at Cornwall.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 89362 of  1 August 1956
Authorizes CNR & NYC to operate over the diamond crossing of their railways at Cornwall.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 91991 of  10 July 1957
(1) Permits CNR to remove the diamond crossing and interlocker at the crossing with the NYC near Cornwall;
(2) rescinds PCO Railway Committee Order of 23 Sep 1898, 22661, 22722, 48690, 66504, 70188, 89195 and 89362. (70188 is an error, should be 71088).


Coteau CNR


Board of Transport Commissioners order 86141 of 5 May 1955
Authorizes CNR to make changes to the interlocker at Coteau.


De Beaujeu CPR-CAR/GTR/CNR 

Railway and Shipping World November 1899
Interlocking and derailing appliances have been installed at St. Polycarpe Jct. where the CPR crossed the Canada Atlantic Ry.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of  19 May 1903
Approves the operation through the interlocking.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 6721 of  31 March 1909
CPR authorized to cross, with its second track, the tracks of the CAR at St. Polycarpe Junction subject to the terms and conditions of the agreement made with the CAR and O&Q dated May 12, 1888.  CPR to submit for the approval of an engineer of the Board a plan showing the changes in the interlocking plant rendered necessary by the crossing with the second track.  Approves the proposed location of the CPR station.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 26093 of 10 May 1917

CPR authorized to reconstruct the interlocking plant at St. Polycarpe Junction.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 38996 of 11 May 1927

Approves plan showing changes proposed to the interlocking plant.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 56600 of 27 October 1938
Approves proposed changes to the interlocking plant at crossing of CNR by the CPR at De Beaujeu.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 58143 of 24 October 1939
Authorizes CPR and CNR to operate trains through interlocking plant at De Beaujeu, m. 35.4 Winchester subdivision.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 61727 of 9 January 1942
Authorizes CPR to move distant signals on the CNR at the interlocking at De Beaujeu.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 63037 of 7 December 1942
Authorizes CPR to operate trains through interlocking plant at the crossing of its railway at De Beaujeu.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 100446 of 10 February 1960
CPR authorized to install an automatic interlocking in lieu of the mechanical interlocking at De Beaujeu.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 100653 of 2 March 1960
CPR and CNR authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking at De Beaujeu without their first being brought to a stop provided the signals are in the "Proceed" position.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-7274 of 19 November 1969
CNR and CPR authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking without their first being brought to a stop provided the signals are in the proceed position.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-33806 of 28 April 1982
CNR authorized to make changes to the interlocking.
    

Fassett, CPR- Salmon River and Northern Railway

Board of Railway Commissioners order 632 of 2 Sep 1905 authorized the Salmon River & Northern Railway, a logging railway owned by Haskell Lumber, to cross the CPR 4 miles east of Montebello at mile 70.6 Lachute subdivision.  The SR&N ran north to bring logs out of the hills but it also needed to move traffic to and from the Ottawa River.  An undated plan showing the layout authorized by the order has survived - it is entitled "C.P.R. East Div. Dist 3, Plan shewing location of proposed Diamond Crossing and sidings for the Haskell Lumber Co, Mileage 70.3 Ottawa Section.

The crossing of the CPR required an interlocking with semaphores but the company needed to use the crossing before the semaphores could be installed in order to transport from the Ottawa River a large quantity of logs which had been floated down and which, if left in their present position, would become embedded in ice or otherwise lost and destroyed.  Interim order 696 was issued on 5 Oct 1905.  This allowed the SR&N to use the crossing between sunrise and sunset and required that the SR&N  provide a flagman to signal to all trains.  SR&N trains were required to come to a full stop before reaching the crossing and could not proceed until the signal had been given.  This order remained in force for a period of ninety days.

There was an application on 28 Mar 1906 for an second interim order.  Owing to inclement weather, frost and snow, the installation of signals was delayed and SR&N needed to use the crossing in order to haul to the mill of the Haskell Lumber Co. a number of logs which were to be floated down the Salmon and Ottawa rivers with the breaking up of the ice.  Without such permission a great deal of valuable property might be detained, imperilled and lost. Order 1044 was issued on 24 Apr 1906 extending terms of 696 until 1 Jul 1906.

The connecting track between the two railways was in the north west quadrant and there were two exchange sidings adjacent to the CPR on the west side of the crossing, 680 feet and 1050 feet long.

The interlocking was presumably installed before the expiry of order 1044. A letter 16 Apr 1930 from CPR to the Board  advised that the interlocker at the crossing of the SR&N directed to be installed by 632 was removed on 14 Sep 1925 due to the SR&N being taken up.


Finch, CPR/NYC




Board of Railway Commissioners order 6646 of  23 March 1909
CPR authorized to cross with its second track the tracks of the Ottawa & New York Ry. at Finch.  CPR to submit for the approval of an engineer of the Board a plan of the changes in the interlocking plant installed at the crossing, rendered necessary by the crossing of the second track.  Ottawa & New York Ry. to bear any additional expenses that may be incurred by reason of the construction and maintenance of the second track.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 9610 of  17 May 1910
CPR and the Ottawa and New York Railways authorized to operate over the interlocked crossing at Finch - in connection with double tracking of CP.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 47132 of 29 July 1931
Approves CPR plan showing proposed changes to the interlocking plant at Finch

Board of Transport Commissioners order 81583 of 15 June 1953
NYC authorized to install automatic interlocking signals in lieu of the existing protection at Finch.  Speed of NYC trains limited to 20 mph at the governing approach signal.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 84248 of 29 July 1954
CPR and NYC authorized to operate through the interlocking at Finch, m. 74.24, Winchester sub. without coming to a stop provided the signals are in the proceed position.  NYC trains limited to 20 mph when passing the approach signal.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 92367 of 23 August 1957
(1) CPR authorized to remove the diamond crossing and interlocker at the crossing with the NYC at Finch;
(2) rescinds PCO Railway Committee order 7293 of Dec 22-23, 1897 and orders 6646, 9610, 30648, 40369, 47132, 61046, 81583 and 84248.



Forfar, CNoR/CNR-BWSSM/CNR 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 13385 of 7 April 1911
CNOR authorized to construct its lines and tracks across the lines and tracks of the Brockville & Westport Railway near Brockville Junction, m. 189.34 from Toronto and to connect same by means of a junction track; the said crossing to be protected by interlocking semaphores, to be placed 1000' from the diamond in each direction

Glen Tay CPR


Railway and Shipping World July 1927
At Glen Tay an interlocking plant controlling all switches will be installed. 

Board of Transport Commissioners order 78834 of  28 April 1952

Approves plan showing interlocking of CPR as installed at Glen Tay.
 

Hammond, CAR/GTR/CNR- CPR 




Both pictures from the Bytown Railway Society, Carriere Collection

Construction of the M&O direct line by Canadian Pacific from Vaudreuil to Ottawa required a crossing of the Canada Atlantic Rockland Branch at Hammond.  Privy Council Railway Committee order of 2 September 1898 approved the crossing and the connection.  There was a diamond crossing together with a connection in the south east quadrant.
Privy Council  Railway Committee order of  2 September 1898
Approves Canadian Pacific Ry. plan and profiles showing proposed crossing and connection with the Rockland Branch of the Canada Atlantic Ry, twp of Clarence.
 

Harrowsmith, CNR/CPR 

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 27 May 1893
The Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. having made appliation for approval of a proposed crossing, at rail level, of the line of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. at apoint a little southerly of the Harrowsmith Station, and both parties having been heard at a meeting on 18 April 1892.The Committee doth order that the place of the propossed crossing shall be varied to a point one thousand feet west of the centre of the present Station of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry., and as so varied the Committee doth approve of the place and mode of crossing, at rail level, of the said lines of railway.
The Committee doth further order that the Appliants shall provide, construct and thereafter maintain at their expense at the said point of crossing, a Diamond crossing, and also an interlocking signal system, with semaphored, signal house, and each and all of the necessary works and appliance, including derails, for properly operating the same in every part thereof, the said works and appliances to be approved by a Government Engineer before the said crossing is used for traffic.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 10 April 1895
Sanctions the location of the place of crossing of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. with the Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. at Harrowsmith.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 2 November 1895
Renewed application by Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. dated 8 March 1895, for approval of a proposed crossing of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. at a point a little southerly of the Harrowsmith Station.
The Committee, after due consideration, and no objection now being made by the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. to the proposed place of crossing, hereby approves of the place and mode of crossing of the said railways as above.
The said crossing to be protected by derails and two distant semaphores, on the Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. one in either direction, placed in such position as shall meet the approval of the Government Chief Engineer of Railways and Canals, in addition to distant signals on the Kingston & Pembroke Ry.; the said derails to be kept locked open during the night - the key (there must not be more than one) locking and unlocking the said derails, to be held in the custody of the Stationmaster at the Harrowsmith Station who will be responsible that they are so kept locked open at night.  All at the cost of the Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry.  The said Stationmaster also to be responsible that trains and engines on the Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. are not allowed to pass the said crossing unless the distant signals on the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. are first set at danger - and that the trains and engines of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. are not allowed to pass the said crossing unless the distant signals on the Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. are first set at danger.
The sd\aid works to be completed to the satisfaction of the Government Chief Engineer of Railways and Canals before the said crossing is used for traffic.
Order dated 27 May 1893 is rescinded.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 10 September 1896
Whereas by an order of the Railway Committee of the Privy Council, dated 2 November 1895, the Committee gave its approval for the place and mode of crossing, at rail level, by the Kingston, Napanee and Western Ry., the tracks of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. at apoint a little southerly of the Harrowsmith station as shown, marked "A" on the plan submitted, it being thereby ordered and directed that all the charges connected with the construction, maintenance and operation of the said crossing, and its protection, to be borne and paid by the said Kingston, Napanee and Western Ry.
And Whereas the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. having applied to the Railway Committee for a variation of the Order of 2 November 1895 and the same having been considered at a meeting of the Committee held this day - the Committee hereby orders, that is to say it doth order that the following terms and conditions are to be carried out in addition to those contained in the order of 2 November 1895.
1. The term "night" in the order of 2 November 1895 shall be considered to be from 8 in the evening to 7 in the morning.
2.  The Station Agent at Harrowsmith to be under the instructions of the Kingston & Pembroke Ry.; notwithstanding a present agreement between the two copanies for a joint control of their employees between Harrowsmith and Kingston.
3.  That from and after the date of this order the sum of 25 cents per day shall be paid by the Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry. to the Kingston & Pembroke Ry. to be applied as part of the Agent's slary at Harrowsmith, for duties he performs for the said Kingston, Napanee & Western Ry.


Privy Council Railway Committee order of 9 July 1909
Crossing of the K&P by the BQR.  Authorizes switching connections between the two railways, already constructed at the east and west ends of the yard.  BQR, at its own expense, authorized to install and maintain semaphores on each railway, to be lighted by BQR section crew and operated by agent of K&P as part of his duties as joint agent.  Rescinds PCO orders dated Nov 22, 1895 and Sept 10, 1896.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 27704 of 9 October 1918
CNOR ordered to install, by 1 Oct 1919, an interlocking plant at m. 18.4 Kingston sub. in the vicinity of Harrowsmith station.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 28968 of 4 November 1919
Time for provision of interlocking ordered by 27704 extended until 31 Jul 1920.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 29763 of 17 June 1920
Time for provision of interlocking ordered by 27704 extended until 31 Jul 1921.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 31010 of 9 May 1921
Time for provision of interlocking ordered by 27704 extended until 31 Jul 1922.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 33468 of 22 March 1923
CNOR ordered to file, by 1 May 1923, details of plans for interlocking and to install interlocking by 1 Aug 1923.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 34026 of 15 August 1923
Time extension for installation of interlocking until 1 Nov 1923.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 34435 of 14 November 1923
Time extension for installation of interlocker to 31 Dec 1923.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 34680 of 17 January 1924
Time for installation of interlocker extended until 1 Mar 1924.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 34779 of 26 February 1924
Approval of the interlocking plant at Harrowsmith.  Speed limited to 15 mph.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 34946 of 23 April 1924
Removes 15 mph speed limit thorugh the interlocking plant at Harrowsmith.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 48870 of 14 July 1932
So long as the character of the traffic over the crossing shown to exist continues, CNR relieved from maintaining signalmen to operate the crossing during the full 24 hours on Sundays and between 15:00 and 23:00 on weekdays; and that the home and distant signals be set clear for the CNR when the signalmen are not on duty.  Any emergency be protected by calling one of the signalmen to operate the plant if and when required to take care of the passage of CPR trains during the hours the plant is not manned.


Board of Transport Commissioners order 74969 of 1 August 1950
Authorizes CNR to make changes to the interlocking plant at CNR and CPR crossing at Harrowsmith.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 76623 of 21 May 1951
Authorizes CNR to make changes to the interlocking plant at crossing over CPR at Harrowsmith.  Rescinds 74969

Board of Transport Commissioners order 78902 of 7 May 1952
Authorizes CNR to operate over the crossing with CPR at Harrowsmith


From Bruce Chapman:  BRS fantrip on May 4th, 1974 crossing the CNR Smiths Falls Subdivision with RDC -1 9072.
By this time, the CNR had the right-of-way as you can see by the clear semaphore on the CN Smiths Falls Subdivision in the distance.



Hawkesbury, CNOR-GTR 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 2030 of  12 November 1906
CNOR granted leave to cross the GTR at a point in the town of Hawkesbury.  The applicant shall, at its own expense, under the supervision of a GTR engineer, insert a diamond in the track of the GTR at the point of crossing.  The crossing shall be protected by an interlocking plant, derails to be placed on the lines of both companies on both sides of said crossing, the said derails to be interlocked with home and distant signals to be operated from a tower, the said tower to be connected by telephone to the GTR station at Hawkesbury.  The normal position of the signals on both lines shall be at "danger" and in the movement of trains of the same or superior class over the said crossing the trains of the GTR to have priority.  A plan shall be submitted for approval of the Chief Engineer of the Board.  The man in charge of the interlocking plant shall be appointed by the GTR.  The CNOR shall bear and pay the whole cost of providing, maintaining and operating the said interlocking.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 2523 of 28 January 1907
CNOR is allowed to use the crossing with the GTR in Hawkesbury for construction trains only as soon as the diamond is placed in the tracks of the GTR and before the installation of the interlocking plant provided for in 2020, for a period of 90 days from the date of this order, or until the said interlocking plant is installed subject to the following conditions;
(1) CNOR shall employ and pay for a watchman nominated by GTR. No CNOR locomotives, trains or cars shall be moved over crossing until watchman has indicated that the way is clear;
(2) Crossing shall only be used by CNOR for construction trains, construction materials and supplies;
(3) Crossing shall not be used under this temporary order so as to interfere in any manner with the passage of GTR trains;
(4) In all questions of liability for accident the watchman to be employed be taken to be the employee of the CNOR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 5112 of 29 July 1908
CNOR authorized to use crossing with GTR for construction trains for a period of 90 days from the date of this order under same terms as Order 2523.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 5798 of 3 December 1908
CNOR authorized to operate their trains over the crossing with the GTR without being brought to a stop.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 8639 of  12 November 1909
GTR authorized to connect its tracks with the tracks of the CNQR in Hawkesbury.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 26931 of  25 January 1918
Amends 2030 to give the CNOR the power to appoint the man in charge of the interlocking tower.

Hull, Canadian Pacific and Hull Electric Crossings

From Bruce Chapman

Timetable #15 of September 27th ,1942:
Ottawa Terminals footnotes:
 Railway crossings at grade with H.E.R. at mileage 87.8 (just west of Ottawa Union which was 87.7 miles from Vaudreuil), at mileage 89.2 (St. Hyacinthe St., east of Hull Beemer which was at mileage 89.3) and Montcalm Street, mileage 89.9 (just east of Hull West which was at mileage 90.0) – Interlocked.
 Hull Electric Co. trolley wires over tracks at St. Hyacinthe St., mileage 89.2 and Montcalm St., mileage 89.9 are less than standard clearance.  Employees must not ride of top of cars at these crossings.

Waltham Subdivision footnotes:
Railway crossing at grade with H.E.Ry. at mileage 0.6 (Hull West was mileage 0.0) – Not Interlocked.
Employees must keep off top of cars passing over switches, Hull Electric Transfer track mileage 0.28 and mileage 0.7 where trolley wires are less than standard clearance.

Privy Council Railway Committee Order of  6 November 1901
Approves the place and mode of junction between the PPJ and HER about 6.75 miles east of Aylmer.


From Malcolm Vant February 2020
I’ve marked (the crossings) as Waltham (1), Ste Hyancinthe (2), and Montcalm (3) on an early (1908) topo map which shows the HER track outside the core but not in it.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 26429 of 15 August 1917
Approves plan X-2-281 showing proposed installation of half interlocking plant at crossing of CPR and HER at St. Hyacinthe Street, Beemer, m. 89.2, M&O sub.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 32367 of 11 May 1922
Cost apportionment for half interlocking plant and gates installed under 31726. Cost of installing and maintenance signals and derails be paid by the Hull Co.; the maintenance of the gates to be paid 80% by the CPR and 20% by the city; the cost of operating signals. derails and gates to be paid 40% by the CPR, 40% by the Hull Electric and 30% by the city

Board of Railway Commissioners order 48644 of 18 May 1932
Refuses application by Hull Electric to operate cars over the tracks of the CPR without first bringing them to a stop. (Waltham sub. mile 0.6)

Additional items from Malcolm Vant, March 2020:


A3331_32 Waltham crossing with HER west of POW bridge and Hull West 1931



A4572_21-001 HER crossing with CP Ste Hyacinthe east of Hull Beemer 1933


A7194_20_HER CPR crossing at Ste Hyacinthe and Hull Beemer 1944


A7194_19-001 HER crossing with CP at Montcalm east of Hull West 1944


Kingston,
Montreal Street, K&P/CPR-KP&C

Board of Railway Commissioners order 11382 of 10 August 1910
Removes statutory speed limit.  Engineers of the Board required certain repairs and alterations to be made to the interlocking plant with the K&P and the Kingston Portsmouth and Cataraqui Electric Street Railway.  The derails and levers are interlocked and in good working order, good drainage has been provided over the rod and wire conduits and derail pits.  For the present the Electric Company is relieved from keeping a watchman at the crossing.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 31300 of 21 July 1921
Time extension for installation of interlocking until 31 Jul 1922.


Ottawa,
Broad Street, CAR/GTR/CNR-OER 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 182 of  7 October 1904
Upon reading the agreement between CAR and OER dated 10 Aug 1904 and the consent of the Corporation of the City of Ottawa dated 6 Oct 1904 it is ordered that a crossing may be had of the said track of the CAR by the main line of the applicant (OER) at the place indicated on the plan filed under No. 13870.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 22218 of  18 July 1914
GTR and OER authorized to operate over the interlocking plant at the crossing at Broad Street authorized by 182.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 31062 of 25 May 1921
OER authorized to disconnect the derail switches from the interlocking plant at the crossing of the GTR and the OER at the junction of Broad Street.  OER to spike its switches so as to render it impossible for a car to be turned down Broad Street from Albert Street, and secure the derail on Broad Street, north of the GTR in the open position so that a car cannot be run through the interlocker.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 32279 of 6 April 1922
OER relieved from paying the proportion of cost of the protection of the diamond crossing on Broad Street as required by 182 as and from 1 Nov 1921 when the work of disconnecting the derail switches from the interlocking plant authorized by 31062 was completed and the OER ceased to operate over the crossing; GTR authorized to operate its trains over the crossing without their first being brought to a stop.


Ottawa,
Campbell's Siding, CPR-GTR/CNR 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 5259 of  1 September 1908
CPR authorized to construct a spur from a point on its most southerly track northwest of its stock yards on the Richmond Road, City of Ottawa, situate about 340' northeasterly from the north west side of the Richmond Road and thence north easterly and easterly through its station yard across the property of William J. Campbell and across the tracks of the GTR on the northwest side of Richmond Road to and into the property of William J. Campbell for a total length of 540'.
(1) a Hayes derail to be installed on CPR 150' from the diamond on each side thereof and a junction semaphore installed at the diamond and a semaphore on the GTR 300' north and 500' south of the diamond, all to be interlocked.
(2) CPR to use the branch only between 13:00 and 15:00. 
(3) CPR to rearrange the line of branch when Richmond Road Viaduct is constructed as directed by 5397 dated 23 June 1908.


Ottawa, Central Depot, CAR-OER

A small cabin was erected close to the interchange between the Canada Atlantic Railway and the Ottawa Electric Railway near the Maria Street station. It is believed that this was just a cabin with no levers.  This can be seen in the picture of the Laurier Street cabin.


  
Ottawa,
Central/Union Station (Sappers Bridge), Canadian Pacific and Hull Electric

Hull Electric cars coming into Ottawa from Hull took the western track of the three tracks running from the Interprovincial Bridge.  Having unloaded passengers, the streetcars crossed the Canadian Pacific main line on a loop track under the Chateau Laurier and back to a loading platform for Hull bound passengers.  Movement over this loop track was controlled by a half interlocking - so called because there were no distant signals.  BRC order 115 of  26 July 1904 authorizes this interlocking as follows:

The Canadian Pacific Ry., upon whose tracks the Hull Electric Ry. operates, do forthwith place a semaphore with two arms interlocking at the point of crossing of the Hull Electric Ry. and the main line of the Canadian Pacific Ry., one arm to extend over the tracks operated by the Hull Electric Ry. and one arm to extend over the main line of the Canadian Pacific Ry., with lights to correspond.  A detailed plan of the interlocking semaphores provided for in the proceeding section  of this order be submitted by the Canadian Pacific Ry. for the approval of the Chief Engineer of the Board, before the installation of the same.  A substantial outer guard rail of wood, 8 inches by 9 inches, shod with angle iron, be placed outside the outside rail, on the incoming track of the Hull Electric Ry. from the Alexandra Bridge to where the incoming track leaves the edge of the retaining wall, except across the two viaducts between these two points which are provided already with guard rails; the speed of the cars over the Hull Electric Ry. not to exceed 8 mph over this part of the track.  The cost of the works are to be borne by the Canadian Pacific Ry.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 115 of  26 July 1904
CPR, upon whose tracks the Hull Electric Railway operates, do forthwith place a semaphore with two arms interlocking at the point of crossing of the Hull Electric Railway and the main line of the CPR, one arm to extend over the tracks operated by the Hull Electric Railway and one arm to extend over the main line of the CPR, with lights to correspond.  A detailed plan of the interlocking semaphores provided for in the proceeding section  of this order be submitted by the CPR for the approval of the Chief Engineer of the Board, before the installation of the same.  A substantial outer guard rail of wood, 8 inches by 9 inches, shod with angle iron, be placed outside the outside rail, on the incoming track of the Hull Electric Railway from the Alexandra Bridge to where the incoming track leaves the edge of the retaining wall, except across the two viaducts between these two points which are provided already with guard rails; the speed of the cars over the Hull Electric Railway not to exceed 8 mph over this part of the track.  The cost of the works are to be borne by the CPR.

Ottawa Journal 1 August 1904
For Safety of Passengers
Regulations by the Railway Commission
The Railway Commission has considered the report of Inspector J.E. Duval and has decided that the Hull and Aylmer electric railway must provide an eight inch guard rail, either of wood or iron, along the outside incoming track of the electric line from the Alexandria (sic) Bridge to a point near the station under Dufferin Bridge.
There is a high embankment at the point around Majors Hill Park and this decision is rendered in the interest of public safety.
The speed of electric cars, when going or coming from the bridge must be limited to eight miles an hour according to an order handed out on Saturday.
There must also be an interlocking semaphore where the Hull electric tracks cross the steam railway on the Ottawa side of the bridge.
When the semaphore is against the steam railway the cars of the latter cannot cross and vice versa.  This is to prevent possible collisions.
The expense of these precautions is to be borne by the Hull and Aylmer Electric Company.

Changes to this arrangement were made through BRC order 16537 of 17 May 1912:

Canadian Pacific Ry. is authorized to carry out changes in the location of the terminal station in the vicinity of the Dufferin Bridge in order to accommodate the electric cars of the Hull Electric Ry.  A split point derail is to be placed on the incoming track used by the Hull Electric cars with semaphores on each side of the diamond.  The levers at the diamond to be operated by a signalman.  Speed over the diamond to be limited to 15 mph.  Crossovers to be spiked and only used in case of emergency.

Temporary operation was granted by order 18127 of 25 November 1912

Canadian Pacific Ry. application to operate its trains over the diamond with the Hull Electric Ry. authorized by 16537 temporarily and pending the completion of a half interlocker to be installed at this point.  Leave granted to operate over the diamond until 31 January 1913 provided that a watchman is stationed and maintained at the crossing to flag the Hull Electric Ry. cars over the crossing.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 18929 of 27 March 1913. Time extension until 31 May 1913 for operation over diamond with HER before the installation of interlocking.

Order 19433 of 31 May 1913 extended time within which Canadian Pacific Ry. was allowed to operate its trains over the diamond with Hull Electric until 30 June 1913 pending installation of the half interlocker.

Full operation was authorized by order 19740 of 3 July 1913 which allowed Canadian Pacific Ry. to operate its trains over the interlocking with the Hull Electric Ry. without their first being brought to a stop.

The interlocking was used until the discontinuance of the Hull Electric service into Ottawa at which time order 68538 of 28 January 1947 rescinded order 16537.

The following extract is taken from the 1913 Hull Electric Ry. rule book:

135. Ottawa Terminal
Cars approaching platforms must be run slowly and under full control.  Passengers must be kept off car steps.  Do not allow them to get off until after the car has stopped.

Passengers must not be allowed to board cars from unloading platform, and under no circumstances shall passengers be allowed to ride on cars across C.P.R. tracks and around loop.  After passengers have left car at unloading platform the car shall proceed carefully and slowly across C.P.R. tracks around to the loading platform in accordance with the special rules and regulations governing this crossing.  Cars shall await leaving time opposite waiting room, and it shall be the duty of the motorman to see that destination sign at this point is properly set.

Ottawa Journal 27 June 1913
Cars cannot collide - new device for Hull Electric
Electric switch installed at station under Chateau Laurier, throws off power in cars.
One of the first electric automatic switches in eastern Canada has been installed by the Hull Electric Railway at the Ottawa station. The switch is worked by electricity and entirely does away with the possibility of a collision between the cars and an out bound or incoming train.  The system has been installed by the Hall Electric Company of New Jersey at a cost of $2,000.  The new system has now been in use only a few days but has proven satisfactory in every way.
When a train is approaching the cars are warned by signals.  If the signals are not seen, however, and the cars still approach the electric power is shut off automatically.  The Hull Electric Railway, in the past, have kept two signal men at this station.  It is a question, however, whether the Railway Commission will allow it to dispense with their services in lieu of the new system.

 

Ottawa, Deep Cut 

The switches and signals in this area were brought together in a small cabin.  Deep Cut had the following controlled interlocking elements:
 1 - junction switch with CPR M&O subdivision
 2 - westward signal between CPR and NYC
 3 - crossover switch at west end of double track from Riverside
 4 - crossover switch at east end of double track from Laurier Bridge
 5, 6 - westward signal (two arms) between double track and CPR   - engine house track switch (hand signalled)
 7 - connecting track switch from Main Street
 8 - signal between engine house and connecting track from Main Street
 9 - switch at start of coach lead
 10 - eastward signal on coach lead 130 feet west of westward main track switch at Deep Cut
 11, 12 - first eastward signal west of Deep Cut on Canal Side of double track (two arms)
 13 - eastward signal 433 feet west of Deep Cut

This is a Newton Photo from the City of Ottawa Archives. MG: 393  Code: AN-NP-030422-001 CA-003541-001 Date: 1954-03-11

Ottawa Journal  24 January 1899

"Mr. William H. Young, representing the Union Switch and Signal Company of Swissvale Pa. is in the city in connection with the interlocking switch system which is to be put in at the junction of the railway lines at the Deep Cut.  The interlocking system is now in use at nearly all junctions lines in the States.  Collisions are impossible with the system.  Mr. Young says his company will have the interlocking system in place by May 31st. and work will be begun in April. The plant, he says will be the finest in America.
In the  interlocking switch system a building is erected at a point where it commands a view of the tracks on all sides for some distance.  A derailing switch is put on each track about 500 feet from the junction.  Further down the track from the derailing switch is put a home signal and some distance beyond is the distance (sic) signal.  The distance signals are usually green and the home signals red.  When a train is approaching the junction and it is signaled to cross, the track is all clear and the interlocking system which connects with all the other tracks shows danger signals on all those lines and any other train attempting to approach would be derailed."

In the event it appears, in latter days at least, the installation at Deep Cut was not interlocked

Board or Railway Commissioners order 48169 of 23 February 1932

In connection with the movement of trains or engines between Deep Cut and Ottawa Union, both stations being within the Ottawa Terminal, CNR to arrange as follows:  

EASTWARD MOVEMENTS  No train or engine shall pass the signal located immediately west of the Laurier Bridge until the preceding train or engine has cleared the signal located 433' west of Deep Cut, which signals respectively control eastward trains. 

WESTWARD MOVEMENTS: No train or engine shall pass: 
(a) semaphore signal located on south side of Renfrew subdivision main track, 800' west of Mann Street subway (which signal controls eastward trains from Main Street); 
(b) semaphore signal at shop track at south side of double track, (which controls engines leaving the shop track); 
(c) semaphore signal first on north side of double track east of Mann Street subway (which controls westward trains on double track from Riverside); 
(d) semaphore signal on north side of the CPR main track east of Mann Street subway (which controls westward trains on the CPR); until the preceding train or engine has passed the signal located 650 feet east of Laurier Bridge, south side.  

The signals referred to are shown in the Special Instructions of the Ottawa Terminals Time-Table No. 43, and on the plans filed with the Board.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 110200 of 24 January 1963
Authorizes CNR to make signal changes between Deep Cut and Riverside, m. 76.8, Alexandria sub.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 120683 of 2 May 1966
(1)  CPR and CNR authorized to operate over the connecting track from m. 86.08, M&O sub. to m. 76.93 Alexandria sub and over the crossover between the CNR westbound main line and eastbound main line. 
(2)  CNR reauthorized to operate over the following CPR tracks (a) m. 3.33 to m. 3.60 Sussex Street sub. (b) on the wye track from m. 3.60 Sussex Street sub to m. 85.95 M. & O. sub. (c) from m. 85.95 to 86.08 M. & O. sub.
(3) CPR authorized to operate from m. 76.93 to m. 77.56 Alexandria sub.
(4) approves less than standard clearances on connecting track between m. 86.08 M&O. sub. and m. 76.93 Alexandria sub. 
(5) movements between Union Station and m. 76.93 Alexandria sub. and from New Connection to Hurdman shall be as prescribed by instructions under Manual Block System. 
(6) Movements between Union Station and New Connection, m. 76.93 Alexandria sub., shall be under the jurisdiction of the Yardmaster at Laurier Avenue controlled by Switch Tenders at Laurier Avenue, Deep Cut and New Connection.  Movements between Hurdman, m. 85.9 M. & O. sub shall be controlled by Operator at Hurdman and Switch Tender at New Connection.




Ottawa, Elgin Street Cabin

Crowds welcoming home Ottawa’s “D” Company at the Canada Atlantic Railway Company’s Elgin Street Train Station, 3 November 1900,
Library and Archives Canada, C-007978.
The cabin is in the right center


From the Ottawa Journal  22 March 1902
The cabin is at the left hand edge
    
Ottawa, Ellwood Diamond or Ellwood Junction, CPR-CNoR/CNR
Note:  In talking about Ellwood care must be taken not to confuse Ellwood Diamond with Ellwood and also Ellwood Junction.  
 Ellwood Diamond is where the Canadian Northern (later Canadian National) crossed the Canadian Pacific on the level.  This was the name used by Canadian Pacific, Canadian National called it Ellwood Junction.
  Ellwood, originally known as Chaudiere Junction, is a little further south and was where the Canadian Pacific Sussex Street line joined their line from Prescott to the Chaudiere..

1) The CNoR was authorized to cross the CPR Prescott line at Ellwood Diamond or Ellwood Junction on 9 September 1910 by order 11723.
2) CNoR construction trains used the diamond with flagging.
Board order 15003 of  3 October 1911 - Time for installing interlocking authorized by 11723 extended to 1 Jan 1912 with leave to apply for an extension if necessary.  In the meantime CNoR may use the crossing under hand signals for construction purposes only until 1 Jan 1912 or as extended.
Board of Railway Commissioners order 15623 of  16 December 1911 Time for the installation of interlocking plant approved by 11723 is extended to 1 Jun 1912 and CNOR is granted leave to use the crossing under hand signal, for construction purposes only, until 1 Jun 1912.
Board of Railway Commissioners order 16529 of 15 May 1912  Time for installation of interlocking authorized by 11723 extended to 1 Sept. 1912
Board of Railway Commissioners order 17383 of  31 August 1912  Time for installation of interlocking extended until 1 Nov. 1912.
3) An interlocking was installed in a tower located in the south quadrant and normal operation was authorized in December 1912.
4) In Aug 1916 CNoR were given authority to construct a transfer track with the CPR.  Powers of expropriation were obtained and Barratt Brothers who were on adjacent land retained powers to be connected directly with the CPR. Two connecting tracks were built on the south side of the diamond and running parallel to the CNOR.  The transfer track was located in the south west quadrant.
5) The transfer track was removed at some time - possibly soon after CNoR was absorbed into the CNR around 1920.
6) In 1933, CNR gained the right to appoint the man in charge of the interlocking.  Before this time he had been appointed by CPR.
7) In August 1935 the interlocking was closed between 20:00 and 04:00 week days and from 04:00  to 20:00 Sundays.
8) On 6 August 1936 CNR obtained permission (BRC order 53342) to convert the mechanical interlocker to automatic operation and this was completed in October 1937. At this time the control was probably passed to Hurdman tower.
Board of Transport Commissioners order 80228  of 19 November 1952. Approves plan showing changes in the signals at interlocking plant at crossing of CNR and CPR at Ellwood.
Board of Transport Commissioners order 80391 of 11 December 1952  Authorizes CNR and CPR to operate their trains through the interlocking at Ellwood without first being brought to a stop.
9) In July 1966 the NCC obtained authority, on behalf of the CPR, to operate over the connection in the north west quadrant.  The formation seems to have been prepared for a connection in the north east quadrant but no opening order can be found and it does not appear ever to have been completed. The interlocking signals at Sawmill Creek on the Ellwood sub northbound and Heron Road southbound on the Beachburg sub are uniquely 3-head searchlight signals, required to signal the nonexistent connecting track as a medium speed (30 mph) route with red over green over red for clear.  Since the Heron Road
signal eventually only controlled the diamond (green over red over red), and the slow speed (red over red over green) connecting track in the northwest quadrant, the medium speed indication was never needed and a plain red light
with no colour changer was substituted for the middle searchlight.  All other signals in the area  have one or two heads.
10) Following the changes CPR and CNR were authorized to operate across the diamond at track speed in September 1966.  CPR was limited to 20 mph between Ellwood Diamond and Walkley Diamond.
Board of Transport Commissioners order 125009 of 18 July 1967 authorized NCC to construct a temporary connecting track from m. 7.24 CNR Ottawa sub. to m. 3.15 CPR Prescott sub. at Ellwood Diamond.  Switch tender to be on duty at all times to handle manual switches under the direction of the Train Dispatcher.  Imposes speed restriction of fifteen miles per hour between the governing signals of the interlocking. This connection came into use in August 1967and was likely removed shortly after CP moved its yard freight operations from Ottawa West to Walkley on October 28-9, 1967.
12) In June 2003 the switch to the connecting chord from the Ellwood sub. was removed as a part of changes carried out to improve the trackage used by the O Train.  Thus Ellwood Diamond is now a diamond with no connecting tracks.


CP 8599 is westbound on the Beachburg subdivision, having just left the connecting track with CP's Prescott subdivision on 26 October 1967.  The Prescott subdivision became the Ellwood subdivision three days later on 29 October.  This connection in the south west quadrant of the crossing of  the two subdivisions was short-lived as it was not required after CP's Ottawa freight operations moved from Ottawa West to Walkley Yard during the night  of October 28-29, 1967.

The view is looking geographically north (eastward on the Beachburg)  with  the Ellwood Subdivision barely visible in the right distance.   The train is likely a yard movement en route to Plant 10, a Francon concrete facility just east of Stittville on the Carleton Place Subdivision.  The sand and gravel in the hopper cars likely arrived Ottawa West earlier in the day from Franceschini Pit on the Waltham Subdivision.

On October 26th, 1967, Work Extra 8599 left Ottawa West southbound at 1105am with engineer Arnold Pearson, still alive in Renfrew Ontario,  Conductor C.J. Mcgee, yardmen Robertson  and Ross McLaughlin
with 21 loads, 1 empty, 2000 tons, 'A' rating going up that hill from Ottawa West to the onfederation/Ellwood Diamond crossing...that must have been something pulling 21 cars singlehandedly around that connecting track on the grade across Heron Road!!

He never booked himself back in, but that evening, 8758-8599 headed back south on old train #83 to this connecting track, leaving Ottawa West at 1945 with 14/22, 1483 tons, coming back the next morning as 1/90 from Smiths Falls with 8784-8599; L.G.Powell conductor, breakies Hart and Delahunt.

Photograph by Bill Linley.

          

Ottawa, Hawthorne, CAR/GTR/CNR - O&NY/NYC 

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 30 May 1898
Approves application by Ottawa & New York Ry. to cross CAR at rail level at Hawthorne subject to the Ottawa & New York Ry. paying entire costs of construction and maintenance of the interlocking arrangement and $500 to the CAR to cover the CAR costs of appearing before the Committee. The plan filed shows approval on 27 June 1898 and/or 23 September 1898.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 17 June 1898
Authorizes installation of interlocking.  Ottawa & New York Ry. shall provide, construct and thereafter maintain and operate at the said point of crossing an interlocking, derailing and signal system and all the necessary works and appliances for properly operating the same.  Ottawa & New York Ry. shall pay to the CAR, within 30 days, the sum of $500 being in payment of all costs, charges and expenses which the CAR have incurred in and about the several applications of the applicants to the Railway Committee of the Privy Council, up to and including 30 May 1898.

Ottawa Free Press 16 July 1898

The Ottawa and Cornwall railway have met another snag in the attempt to cross the Canada Atlantic tracks east of Hurdman's bridge, to effect a junction with the Montreal and Ottawa line.  It is said that the Canada Atlantic people object to the Cornwall road putting down what is known as an interlocking switch.  The trouble will delay the opening of the new road, and unless a compromise arrangement is reached the matter will have to be threshed out before the Railway Committee of the Privy Council.

An interlocking was installed where the O&NY crossed the CAR at Hawthorne.  This was a plain crossing with just a diamond and no interchange track. A plan prepared by the Canada Switch & Spring Co of 18 May 1898 was filed with the Privy Council shows "the arrangement of signals and derails for crossing of O&NY and CAR at Hawthorne".  The Railway Committee of the Privy Council approved this on 7 Jun 1898.  The interlocking tower is shown to the south east of the diamond.  This was a 15 lever machine with three spare levers.  The function of each lever was as follows:
 
1. O&NY eastbound distant 6. Spare 11. Derails at signals 11 and 12
2. O&NY eastbound home 7. Slip diamond 12. CAR westbound home
3. CAR eastbound distant 8. Slip diamond 13. CAR westbound distant
4. CAR eastbound home 9. Spare 14. O&NY westbound home
5. Derails at signals 2 and 14 10. Spare 15. O&NY westbound distant

In all cases:

  • the distant signals were 1,200 feet in advance of the home signal;
  • the home signals were 50 feet in advance of the derail;
  • the derails were placed 500 feet in advance of the diamond.
(National Archives negative no. NMC 184285)

On 19 Nov 1921, the NYC was relieved from maintaining a signalman between the hours of 22:30 and 06:30 daily provided that the signals and derails be set clear for the GTR and against the NYC.  On 14 Mar 1922, this was modified to provide that special movements may be made over the crossing during the hours the operators were off duty on condition that NYC arrange to have operators called to operate the signals when each special movement was made. The GTR had to be advised in sufficient time to allow trainmen to be advised of such special movements.
On 26 Oct 1928, (BRC order 41669) the NYC was relieved from maintaining signalmen between 06:30 and 22:30 on Sundays; provided that the signals and derails be set clear for CNR and against NYC during the said hours; the key of the tower was to be retained by NYC; in the event of an emergency movement over the crossing on the part of the railways requiring the operation of the interlocking plant, the matter was to be arranged between the companies and the operators called to protect such movments.
On 28 Jun 1932, the arrangement was further altered so that arrangements could be made whereby a signal can be provided at the intersection of the two railways, set for the CNR at all times when a telegrapher was not on duty.  The NYC was granted leave to maintain one telegrapher daily except Sunday.
On 13 Nov 1945,(BRC order 66677) following alterations, the CNR and NYC were authorized to operate through the interlocking without stopping provided the signals indicated proceed.  NYC trains were not to exceed 15 mph when approaching the crossing.
On 28 Nov 1946, (BRC 68225) theNYC was authorized to install automatic interlocking signals in lieu of the present mechanical interlocking.  The work was completed and on 13 Jun 1947 CNR were authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking plant  "without their first being brought to a stop:  PROVIDED the signals are in the "proceed" position". 
Board of Transport Commissioners order 69089 of 13 June 1947. CNR and NYC are authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking plant at the crossing at Hawthorne  "without their first being brought to a stop:  PROVIDED the signals are in the "proceed" position"
On 5 Mar 1948, CNR were authorized (BRC 70344) to operate passenger trains at a speed of fifty mph through the automatic interlocking.
Further work was carried ut in 1954 and on 15 Dec of that year CNR and NYC were authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking without their being brought to a stop, provided the signals were in the proceed position. 
Board of Transport Commissioners order 85195 of 17 December 1954. CNR and NYC authorized to operate their trains through the interlocking at Hawthorne without their being brought to a stop, provided the signals are in the proceed position.

On 12 July 1957, CNR were authorized (by BRC 92032)  to remove the diamond crossing and interlocker at the crossing with NYC at Hawthorne.  Rescinds Privy Council Railway Committee order of 7 Jun 1898 and 31795, 31845, 32234, 41669, 48800, 66677, 68225, 69089, 70344 & 85195..

   

Ottawa, Hurdman, CPR-CAR/GTR/CNR-ONYR/NYC


My dad the telegraph operator at the CPR Hurdman Tower September 1952 - Agatha Houke

The final interlocking frame was over 30 feet long.  Some of the remote switches were electrically controlled, including the CNR switch at Riverside and the connecting track switches at Ellwood diamond. Most of the switches at Hurdman were controlled by rods (also called pipes).

Details of the first interlocking (St.L&O crossing M&O and CAR) are shown on Union Switch and Signal plan C 2028 revised to 4 Nov 1898. This shows the connection with O&NY as well as a proposed line to a lumber yard (running south from between switches 19 and 20).  The two quadrants (north and south connecting tracks) between Sussex St. sub and M&O are also shown.

Arrangement of levers:
 
1. Eastbound M&O distant. 19. Switch M&O/O&NY.
2. Eastbound M&O home. 20. (a) Switch M&O/North Connecting track and;
      (b) Southbound derail  on North Connecting track.
3. Eastbound M&O starter. 21. (a) Switch M&O/South Connecting track.
      (b) Northbound derail on South Connecting track.
4. Eastbound O&NY starter. 22. (a) Switch St.L&O/South Connecting track and;
      (b) Southbound derail on South Connecting track.
5. Southbound StL&O distant 23. Southbound StL&O derail (protects StL&O/CAR diamond).
6. Southbound StL&O home. 24. Westbound CAR derail (protects StL&O/CAR dimond).
7. Southbound StL&O starter. 25. Northbound StL&O derail (protects StL&O/CAR diamond).
8. Westbound M&O distant. 26. Eastbound CAR derail (protects StL&O/CAR diamond).
9. Westbound M&O home. 27. Spare.
10. Westbound O&NY distant. 28. Spare
11. Westbound O&NY home. 29. Spare
12. Spare. 30. Westbound CAR home.
13. Spare. 31. Westbound CAR distant.
14. Spare. 32. Northbound StL&O starter.
15. East and westbound M&O derails (protect StL&O/M&O diamond). 33. Northbound StL&O home
16. (a) Switch StL&O/North Connecting track and;
      (b) Northbound derail on North Connecting track.
34. Northbound StL&O distant.
17. South and northbound StL&O derails (protects StL&O/M&O diamond). 35. Eastbound CAR home.
18. Westbound O&NY derail. 36. Eastbound CAR distant.

12 levers for 18 switches and 18 locks
18 levers for 18 signals and 4 b. locks
30 working levers
6 spare spaces (12-13-14-27-28-29)
36 lever frame

Signals 3 and 4 were on the same mast with signal 4 being to the right of and lower than signal 3. The 14' x 20' tower was in the south west quadrant of the StL&O/M&O diamond and was aligned parallel to the StL&O.

(RG 46 M 2000012783 Acc. No. 77803/23 D1097 F 19 (National Archives negative No. NMC 184286))

The Ottawa Citizen of 24 January 1899 describes the installation of the first interlocking at this location:

Mr. W.W. Young, of the Union Signal and Switch Co. of Swissvale, Pa., is in the city arranging for the installing of one of the company’s switch plants at Ottawa East, where the C.P.R., C.A.R. and O. & N.Y. roads cross.
This plant, which is in operation in the railway yards in Toronto and other large centres, is a complex and ingenious arrangement. By it the entire system of switches is brought under the control of one man, stationed in a central tower giving full view of the tracks and switches under his control.  The different signals, switches derails, etc. are distinguished in the usual way by the standard colored lights and discs.  Each switch is connected to the central tower with levers numbered and colored correspondingly.  These are ranged in rows and under the immediate control of the operator.  When he wishes to clear a line he works the levers attached to the switches along that line, some of which may be a long distance off.  The switches are interlocked both in the tower and at the track, so that the latter is made absolutely safe, which is shown by the connecting signals.  Should the operator make a mistake or neglect his duty, the switches through the signals show this end and the oncoming train is brought to a standstill
.

Privy Council Railway Committee order of 23 September 1898
Approves the junction of the NY&O and the CPR (M&O).  NY&O to provide, maintain and operate a complete interlocking plant.  An interlocking plant shall be provided, maintained and operated by the CPR for the crossings of the M&O and CAR by the St.L&O.  NY&O to pay such portion of the first cost as is fairly chargeable to said junction and 1/3 the cost of operation and maintenance of the plant.  CPR trains of the same or superior class to have priority in using said junction

Privy Council Railway Committee order PC1899-145 of 18 March 1899
Authorizes the Ottawa & New York Ry. to cross certain Rideau Canal Reserve lands, namely part of lot F conc. D, Rideau Front, Nepean twp.  This is done by way of a lease during pleasure to cross with two tracks only, the rental being $50 for each track. The plan attached shows two tracks between the CAR and Hurdman's Bridge Road.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 8816 of  3 March 1909
CNOR authorized to open for carriage from Rockland to Hurdman's Bridge near Gladstone Avenue, Ottawa

Board of Railway Commissioners order 12723 of 6 December 1910
CNOR authorized to construct its lines across Hurdman's Road on lot "F" conc "D" twp of Nepean, m. 57.8 west from Hawkesbury.
(1) CNOR may cross for freight only until 1 Dec 1912. 
(2) Crossing to be protected by gates at CNOR expense. 
(3) Tracks to be removed by CNOR on or before 1 Dec 1912, under penalty of $100 per day for every day CNOR is in default.
(4) If crossing is used for purposes other than freight traffic the Board retain the right to order tracks to be removed at any time. 
(5) City of Ottawa is at liberty at any time to apply to limit the hours at which the crossing should be used and also for an order directing the CNOR to remove its tracks if the new railway entrance to Ottawa is arranged and ready for use prior to 1 Dec 1912.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 16451 of 3 May 1912
CNOR to bear the cost of changes to the interlocking plant and that the cost of operating and maintaining the interlocking plant be divided equally between the NY&O, CPR, GTR and CNOR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 16656 of  31 May 1912 Time for installation of permanent interlocking plant extended until 1 Oct. 1912

Board of Railway Commissioners order 17969 of  5 November 1912 Time for installation of permanent interlocking extended until 30 Apr. 1913.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 19783 of  5 July 1913. Time for installation of interlocking ordered by 11386 extended to 31 July 1913.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 21333 of  9 February 1914
(1) CNOR authorized to construct across CPR Ottawa to Prescott Branch near Hurdman's Bridge, Nepean twp.
(2) CNOR shall, at its own expense and under the supervision of an engineer of the CPR, insert a diamond in the track of the CPR at the said crossing.
(3) CNOR to bear the whole cost.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 22792 of  9 October 1914
CNOR and CPR authorized to operate temporarily their trains over the crossing of the Ottawa Prescott branch near Hurdman's Bridge, Nepean, pending construction of alterations in the interlocking plant and provided the same are flagged over the crossing.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 23373 of  27 February 1915
The crossing between CNOR and CPR at Hurdman's Bridge, Nepean is particularly light, there is in fact no night traffic on the CPR.  So long as the character of the movements over the crossing shown to exist continues, companies are relieved from maintaining a night signalman to operate the crossing; home signals and derails to be set clear for the CNOR; key to the tower to be left in the custody of the CNOR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 24888 of  11 April 1916
CNOR and GTR given authority to connect their tracks for the use of the Union Station at Ottawa, under an agreement dated August 17, 1914, to file detail plans showing shanges to the interlocking plant necessitated by the construction of the connecting track.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 24952 of  6 May 1916
CPR authorized to construct across the CNOR and Russell Road a wye track connecting the tracks of the StL&O and the M&O at m. 85.81 M&O line. The wye to be connected to the interlocking plant

Board of Railway Commissioners order 25240 of  2 August 1916
The additions to the interlocking plant being in accordance with 24952, CPR and CNOR authorized to operate their trains over the crossing  without their first being brought to a stop.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 33290 15 January 1923
Approves CNOR plan showing layout of interlocking plant proposed to be installed at the crossing of the Sussex Street branch by two tracks of the CNOR at Hurdman. To be installed by 15 Jul 1923.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 43171 of 3 August 1929.
Approves CNR plan showing signal protection proposed to be installed at the crossing of CNR and CPR m. 0.4 at Hurdman.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 50950 of  23 April 1934
Approves changes to interlocking at the crossing of CNR and junction with Ottawa & New York Ry. at Hurdman

Board of Transport Commissioners order 61064 of  5 August 1941
Approves plan showing proposed changes to interlocking plant at crossing of Sussex Street branch and M&O subdivision by the CNR and junction with the Ottawa & New York Ry. at Hurdman.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 62903 of  4 November 1942
Authorizes CNR and CPR to operate their trains through interlocking plant at Hurdman (crossing of Sussex Street, M&O & Alexandria subs and junction with NYC) without their first being brought to a stop; provided the signals are in the "proceed" position.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 76022 of  1 February 1959
Approves plan showing changes to interlocker at crossing of CPR and CNR and junction with Ottawa & New York Ry. at Hurdman.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 87633 of 15 December 1955
(1) City of Ottawa authorized to construct a highway across the rights of way of CPR and CNR opposite the new bridge being constructed across the Rideau River east of Hurdman Bridge at m. 3.77 Sussex Street sub. and m. 0.38 Hurdman Spur;
(2) Upon completion CNR and CPR to close the existing crossing of tremblay Road;
(4) CPR to install two flashing light signals and one bell west of the CNR and two flashing light signals and one bell east of the CPR to operate as protection for multiple track crossing, and make the necessary changes to the Hurdman Interlocker necessitated by the installation of highway crossing protection;
(3), (5) - (8) cost apportionment..

Board of Transport Commissioners order 120683 of 2 May 1966
(1)  CPR and CNR authorized to operate over the connecting track from m. 86.08, M&O sub. to m. 76.93 Alexandria sub and over the crossover between the CNR westbound main line and eastbound main line. 
(2)  CNR reauthorized to operate over the following CPR tracks (a) m. 3.33 to m. 3.60 Sussex Street sub. (b) on the wye track from m. 3.60 Sussex Street sub to m. 85.95 M. & O. sub. (c) from m. 85.95 to 86.08 M. & O. sub.
(3) CPR authorized to operate from m. 76.93 to m. 77.56 Alexandria sub.
(4) approves less than standard clearances on connecting track between m. 86.08 M&O. sub. and m. 76.93 Alexandria sub. 
(5) movements between Union Station and m. 76.93 Alexandria sub. and from New Connection to Hurdman shall be as prescribed by instructions under Manual Block System. 
(6) Movements between Union Station and New Connection, m. 76.93 Alexandria sub., shall be under the jurisdiction of the Yardmaster at Laurier Avenue controlled by Switch Tenders at Laurier Avenue, Deep Cut and New Connection.  Movements between Hurdman, m. 85.9 M. & O. sub shall be controlled by Operator at Hurdman and Switch Tender at New Connection.


     

Ottawa Junction (see also Hurdman), Canadian Northern Ontario

BRC order  of 6 Jul 1909 auhorized the CNOR to cross and connect with the Ottawa & Prescott Railway at m. 56.6 west from Hawkesbury.  CNOR to install an interlocking plant at its own expense.  Interlocking to be installed within 60 days after construction of CNOR.

BRC order 7597 of 24 July 1909 provides as follows:
(1) CNOR allowed to use the crossing with the Ottawa & Prescott for construction purposes only pending the installation of the interlocker provided for in 7490;
(2) All CNOR trains to be brought to a full stop and do not proceed to make the crossing until the flagman signals that the way is clear aand to proceed;
(3) A flagman be stationed at the crossing for the purpose of flagging trains across; such flagman to be appointed by CPR and paid for by CNOR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 10787 of  6 June 1910
The interlocking plant ordered to be installed by 7490 having been completed and in good condition for operation, CNOR and CPR authorized to operate their trains over the crossing without their first being brought to a stop.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 11172 of 13 July 1910
CNOR authorized to construct its lines and tracks across the lines and tracks of the GTR near Ottawa in the County of Carleton.  CNOR to install a Manganese Steel Diamond, derails and semaphores at the crossing, - the said derails and semaphores to be operated from the tower already located at Rideau Junction.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 11386 of 6 August 1910
Rescinds 11172.  CNOR authorized to construct its lines and tracks across the lines and tracks of the GTR and CPR near Ottawa in the County of Carleton.  CNOR to install a Manganese Steel Diamond, derails and semaphores at the crossing, - the said derails and semaphores to be operated from the tower already located at Rideau Junction.
This is the same as 11172 except for the additional reference to CPR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 14981 of 19 September 1911
CNORauthorized to construct its lines and tracks across the lines and tracks of the Brockville & Westport Railway near Brockville Junction, m. 189.34 from Toronto and to connect same by means of a junction track; the said crossing to be protected by interlocking semaphores, to be placed 1000' from the diamond in each direction

Board of Railway Commissioners order 15638 of 10 December 1911
Time for installation of interlocking authorized by 11386 extended to 1 June 1912.

A 1915 plan showing changes to the Hurdman Interlocking shows the interlocking where the CNOR crossed the Sussex Street line.  The tower is in the north east quadrant and close to the diamond which has an angle of 92 degrees 16 minutes.

The diamond is protected by home and distant semaphores in each direction on the Sussex Street line and from Hawkesbury and Henderson Avenue but not from Rideau Junction.  Derails are placed on the switch for movements to Henderson or Hurdman off the Hawkesbury line, both sides.

With the Sussex Street sub. already a low traffic switching line and the reduction in trains which took place after CNOR became part of CNR the traffic over this interlocking was not high.

BRC order 23373 of 27 Feb 1915 notes that the crossing between CNOR and CPR at Hurdman's Bridge, Nepean is particularly light, there is in fact no night traffic on the CPR.  So long as the character of the movements over the crossing shown to exist continues, companies are relieved from maintaining a night signalman to operate the crossing; home signals and derails to be set clear for the CNOR; key to the tower to be left in the custody of the CNOR.

BRC order 33290 of 15 Jan 1923 approves CNOR plan showing layout of interlocking plant proposed to be installed at the crossing of the Sussex Street branch by two tracks of the CNOR at Hurdman. To be installed by 15 Jul 1923.  Order 33939 of 26 Jul 1923  granted a time extension for installation until 1 Sep 1923. The new interlocking was authorized by order 34234 of 26 Sep 1923 which authorized CPR and CNR ato operate their trains over the crossing without bringing them to a stop, provided the signals are clear and that the speed of trains shall not exceed 15 mph.

BRC order 37458 of 3 Apr 1926 provided that:
(1) So long as the character of the movements over the crossing of the CPR by two tracks of the CNOR shown to exist continues, CNOR and CPR are relieved from maintaining a signalman entirely on Sundays and between 19:00 and 09:00 on weekdays; the signals to be set for the CNOR and against the CPR; the key to the tower to be retained by the CNOR, but if CPR desires to make a movement during the time the crossing is closed, a notice shall be given to the CNOR and the operator shall be called to take charge of the interlocking plant to cover the movement desired.
(2) CPR is authorized, at the expense of the CNOR, to move the east distant signal on the CNOR to a point 600' from the home signal.

It is not known when Ottawa Junction interlocking was taken out of service.  It likely lasted until the abandonment of the L'Orignal subdivision in July 1939.




Ottawa, Laurier Avenue/Maria Street Cabin


After 1900 there was a signal cabin on the east side of the tracks just north of Laurier Bridge (under the arch), with nothing on the canal side. (LAC A-008936) Farther north, at the extreme left was a switch tender's cabin (for the OER interchange) and the 1895 Maria Street temporary station, now serving as the freight office. The Grand Trunk 1907 B&B book identified the signal house as 8.25 x 5.25 x 8 feet and the freight office as 74.5 x 25.25 x 18 feet.The switchtender cabin was not listed.
Adjacent to the bridge on the north side was the boiler room, (with smokestack), 50 x 16.5 x 14.75 feet.


From Doug Stoltz December 2019
This must be the simplest possible interlocking system, with a single turnout and a signal for each approach.  Not worth the bother anywhere else, but the controls in this case needed to be placed remote from the switch.  This did away with the need for the original west-end switchtender.  That man would have had a fair bit of down time, even with numerous passenger trains and engines coming in and out of Hull/Ottawa West.   More efficient to run everything from the east end, site of the manual (and non-interlocked) switches governing Tracks 1 to 8 and the associated semaphores. 
It's interesting to note the way the panel was set up.  The choices were between Track 1 or 2 (N or R) and between outbound and inbound movement using the control marked "signals."  The signals in effect set themselves based on that choice and whether the selected route was occupied.  It appears that L (leave?) enabled outbound movements and cleared the dwarf signal on either Track 1 or 2 (light 2LA or 2LB), depending on which which way the switch was set.   The R setting cleared the 3-aspect eastward signal for inbound movements.  For the latter, timetable footnotes indicate a high or middle green (2RA or 2RB) was displayed when the selected track was vacant (1 or 2, respectively) and a low yellow (2RC) if it was occupied. 
These signals were independent of the manual block system in operation Ottawa-Deep Cut-Riverside and the electric staff block system Ottawa Union-Ottawa West, both of which governed main track movements.  Thus, CNR switchers could not pass the switch towards the Chateau unless the crew first collected a staff from the CPR operator.

From Rian Manson December 2019
This  was taken in the basement of Andrew Merrilees Davenport Rd. Office building. The box is in the collection at Candaian Sxcience and technology Musuem

From David Jeanes December 2019
I assume from the picture that the three red lights show track occupancy of track 1, track 2, the switch, and the 3500-foot approach from Alexandra Bridge to the switch.
The five white lights would show when the track 1 and track 2 dwarf signals and the 3-head mainline signal were clear, (green, or yellow for the bottom aspect).  I presume these lights were off when the signals were red. The approach signal 1200 feet north of the switch is not shown on the panel.
I presume that the two lights on the switch controL lever and the one on the signal control lever were only illuminated after the switch points and the signals had actioned as directed.

Railway and Marine World March 1911
It is proposed to install an interlocking switch system at the company's terminal yard and station, Ottawa.

Railway and Marine World November 1911
The passenger yard tracks are built of 100 Ib. rail with no. 9 frogs. All the switches are on the one ladder, which gives the engine driver approaching the yard a clear view of the condition of all the switches. Ultimately it is the intention to have all these switches interlocked, the tower to be located either on or near Laurier bridge.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 120683 of 2 May 1966
(1)  CPR and CNR authorized to operate over the connecting track from m. 86.08, M&O sub. to m. 76.93 Alexandria sub and over the crossover between the CNR westbound main line and eastbound main line. 
(2)  CNR reauthorized to operate over the following CPR tracks (a) m. 3.33 to m. 3.60 Sussex Street sub. (b) on the wye track from m. 3.60 Sussex Street sub to m. 85.95 M. & O. sub. (c) from m. 85.95 to 86.08 M. & O. sub.
(3) CPR authorized to operate from m. 76.93 to m. 77.56 Alexandria sub.
(4) approves less than standard clearances on connecting track between m. 86.08 M&O. sub. and m. 76.93 Alexandria sub. 
(5) movements between Union Station and m. 76.93 Alexandria sub. and from New Connection to Hurdman shall be as prescribed by instructions under Manual Block System. 
(6) Movements between Union Station and New Connection, m. 76.93 Alexandria sub., shall be under the jurisdiction of the Yardmaster at Laurier Avenue controlled by Switch Tenders at Laurier Avenue, Deep Cut and New Connection.  Movements between Hurdman, m. 85.9 M. & O. sub shall be controlled by Operator at Hurdman and Switch Tender at New Connection.



Ottawa, Main Street, OA&PS/CAR/GTR 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 9802 of 1 March 1910
GTR ordered to protect Main Street, in that part of the City of Ottawa which formerly constituted the village of Ottawa East, by gates, to be installed by GTR not later than 1 Jun 1910 and operated by a day and a night watchman. Cost of installation to be paid 60% by GTR, 20% by City of Ottawa and 20% out of the Railway Grade Crossing Fund.  Cost of watchmen to be paid 80% by GTR and 20% by City.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 31834 of 28 November 1921
Appliction by GTR to substitute an electric bell and wigwag for the watchman at Echo Drive is denied.  There are so many shunting movements that it would be difficult to ascertain which movements were going to use the crossing.  The GTR also suggested that the signals could be activated manually by the watchman at Main Street but he would not have a good view and this would defeat the automatic nature of the system.



Ottawa, Nepean Junction, CNR

Junction between Renfrew and Beachburg subdivisions.  There was only a cabin for the operators here.

Matt-1561
   

Ottawa, Queen Street West/Fleet Street, OER-CAR/GTR/CNR 

This interlocking was situated where the CAR Chaudiere line crossed the double track OER at Queen Street West (Queen Street later became Fleet Street).

From the Ottawa Citizen 23 July 1938.

"On October 27, 1907, Ottawa was the scene of an accident in which many people had narrow escapes from death.
"A street car on the Chaudiere line crashed into a G.T.R. freight train at the Queen street west crossing.  The entire vestibule of the car was crushed in, and the car turned across the tracks.  It was on its way to the Chaudiere filled with passengers.  Motorman Page and Conductor Brisbois were in charge.  As the car came down the grade nearing the G.T.R. crossing, a long freight train was pulling out of the city.  The motorman tried to apply the brakes but they failed to work.  Then as the car went on down the incline, Conductor Brisbois ran back and put the brake on at the rear.  He then shouted for the passengers to jump for their lives.
Many of the passengers sprang through the windows and doors but others were too slow and were still in the car when it struck the freight train.  A middle-aged woman was just leaving the rear steps when the crash came, and was thrown towards the train.  This was not the only narrow escape.  Just at the moment when the car struck the train Motorman Page jumped.  The next instant the entire vestibule was crushed in."

Following this accident the Board of Railway Commissioners order 4460 of 12 March 1908, ordered the GTR, which was junior,  to protect the crossing by:

(1) placing derails one 75' from point of crossing on east side of the GTR and on north track of OER and one 75' from crossing on east side of the GTR and on the south track of the OER.  The derails were to be interlocked with gates so that when the gates were down the derails to be open and against the OER and when raised the derails to be closed.
(2) Cost to be borne by GTR.
(3) A trolley guard be placed over the trolley wire on the south track of the OER where it crosses GTR and to be installed at the expense of the OER.

The trolley guard was to prevent the trolley pole from coming away from the wire and stranding the car across the crossing.  It was only considered necessary on the OER south track because cars were running downgrade on the north track.

There was a great deal of procrastination on the part of the GTR and the installation was not installed and placed in proper working condition until July 1914.

This was a very busy crossing for streetcars, vehicles and pedestrians and it was decided to install an interlocking plant which would provide for the crossing gates to be automatically lowered when the signals werere set in the clear position on the GT tracks and the derails are open on the OER tracks.  The arrangement is shown on GTR plan SD-1091 dated 24 April 1914 and the installation was approved on 27 October 1915.

The lever frame was of the W.H. Patton type consisting of 5 levers which had the following functions:
 
1Double gates on the east side closing across the OER.4GTR home signal for northbound trains.
2Double gates on the west side closing across the OER.5GTR home signal for southbound trains.
3Derails on the OER, one on the approach on each of the OER tracks.

The derails were both pipe operated, all in oil pipe and the gates were cable operated.  The signals were pipe operated and interlocked with the derails and the gates were interlocked with the signals and derails.  The ground lever cabin was was in the north east quadrant and had a concrete foundation and leadout cellar.

The working of the interlocking plant was as follows:
- first movement is to open the derails on the OER;
- second to lower the gates;
- third to lower the home signal to clear position.

On 13 November 1916 there was a complaint from V. Bouvin on behalf of the Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America.  The motormen suggested that if there was a light signalling a car that the derail switch is against them it would save a lot of worry and derailment.  As it is, a car has no way to know if the switch is against them until they come too close, especially in the dark.

The BRC was particularly concerned about the eastern derail which was located on a down grade about 66’ from the GTR.  Both derails were often out of order.  Cars going west on Wellington Street towards Queen Street may coast for mile without need of any power, in fact cars on this route would run away if not kept in hand - hand brakes only were in use.  The BRC felt that ample warning of the approach to the derail was essential. The derails were often out of order, particularly west of the crossing during severe winter weather due to water running down the track into and freezing them when closed.  The GTR attempted to put in a drain but were prevented from doing so by refusal of the owner of a small piece of property over which we wanted to run the drain.

On Saturday 17 November 1917 additional changes were put into service.  The east derail, originally 66' from the crossing, was moved 50 further away from the crossing placing it close to the bridge over the spillway from the waterworks Pumping Station.  A cluster of lights was installed immediately over each derail.  This cluster consisted of six white lights and a red one and was controlled by a switch in the gateman’s shanty.  The procedure was for the gateman to turn on the switch before opening the derails.  The lights do not appear to have been interlocked.

On 29 November 1921 the GTR applied for an order that would permit the company’s trains to pass over Queen Street West crossing without stopping. The matter was thoroughly investigated by the BRC which was concerned that vehicular and pedestrian traffic were extraordinarily heavy, there were no derails on the GTR and the present protection was not positive and that OER cars operated over the crossing controlled by hand brakes only.

The GTR connected the J.R. Booth lumberyard and the tracks north of Queen Street with the main track at Rochester Street and was used entirely for freight movements.  The approaches on the GTR were on heavy curvature in both directions with short views of the home signals due to obstruction by buildings. It was important that GTR trains approach the home signals at slow speed, the northbound movement being on a down grade and, in every case being a backup or reverse movement. All trains were backed up out of Rochester Street to the Eddy Yard.  The locomotive was on the leading end for the run from Eddy back to Rochester Street.

OER cars westbound were also on a down grade.  In November 1921 an OER car failed to stop clear of the derails resulting in a derailment and the car fouling the GTR track.

GTR practice was for trains to come to a slow rate of speed and not actually come to a stop.  GTR felt that this is perfectly safe as the crossing was protected and trains were under control.  To bring the trains to a full stop difficulty would be, at times, experienced in starting up again and in addition to this if trains are of any length it would likely block other streets.

On 10 March 1922 the GTR and OER were authorized to operate over the crossing at Queen Street West without their trains being first brought to a stop provided the speed shall not exceed 10 mph.

On 9 July 1925 the CNR was authorized to discontinue the watchman on Sundays which saw no trains that day.  At that time the operating hours were from 10:00 to 18:00 there being no train movements outside these hours with the exception of the winter months when logs were sometimes moved at which time a watchman was placed in charge of the crossing in every case where switching or train movements were made across it.

There was an accident on 1 October 1929 at 02:10.  Yard engine 7135 was passing over the crossing with 12 cars at about 3 mph when a Whippet coach auto crashed through the gates and hit the side of the train.  The passenger was slightly injured and the driver was sentenced to 7 days for driving a car while under the influence of liquor.  The report indicated that the crossing was well protected with gates, signals on the railway and derail on electric railway all worked manually from a cabin on the north east side of the track. There was also a bell that the man in charge would ring before he started to work his levers.  There were two men handling movements – one 09:00 to 18:00 who was relieved by another man who worked until 02:00 unless advised to remain longer by the Yard Office.

There is no mention in the file of when the interlocking was removed but it presumably was taken out of service shortly after the last streetcar ran to Hull on 27 November 1954.  There was a proposal, in 1962, to install push button operated flashing lights and bells with a cantilever structure but this came to nought as the National Capital Commission was negotiating over the future of the E.B. Eddy plant which, apart from the little used team track ramp and overhead crane at Chaudiere Yard, were the only remaining users of the Chaudiere line.

The crossing was taken out of use when this portion of the Chaudiere branch was abandoned on 15 November 1965.

Sources:     National Archives RG 46 vol. 1498 case 3050
                   Orders of the BRC/BTC and CTC

 

Ottawa, Rideau Canal drawbridge, CAR/GTR/CNR

The original drawbridge over the Rideau Canal was built around March 1882 just before the opening of the Canada Atlantic Railway into Ottawa.  Authority for the canal crossing was given by Order in Council PC 1882-414 of 6 March 1882 which:

Approves application by the Canada Atlantic Ry. for authority to cross the Rideau Canal by means of a swing bridge to be constructed at a point near the City of Ottawa, Stewarton shown on a plan submitted.
The Chief Engineer of Government Railways reported "there seems to be no objection to allow a railway crossing at the place mentioned provided the approach to the swing bridge on the Stewarton side is made either of open work or has openings in it so as will allow the water to flow freely and that there shall be no descending grade in the immediate vicinity of the bridge and leading to it and greater than 20 feet to the mile. Also that there shall be proper rest piers for the bridge when open and that these piers shall have guards and the whole as well as the superstructure of the bridge shall correspond to the centre line of the Canal as marked out by the officer in charge of the Canal, openings for navigable channel on side of centre pier for swing bridge to be not less than 40 feet in width."
Authority was given subject to the above conditions.


Just after construction in September 1882 - PA-12201


Canada Atlantic Roundhouse was built in 1882. It is under construction here so the photo is probably that year.


A view of the drawbridge showing the semaphore signal in the centre with possibly the Bridgemaster leaning on the post.  Behind the bridge can be seen the Elgin street roundhouse. 
  This is where the Queensway bridge over the Rideau Canal is located today.  (Collection N. Bruce Ballantyne.)


June 1902 from the LAC PA-28212 Topley Collection.  This is taken from the north west quadrant near the CAR yard


About 1910-15 in GTR days.  LAC PA-9936.  A similar picture was taken a shortly afterwards with the train further advanced.
In the foreground is the siding to the Ottawa Silicate Company on the Rideau Canal see item 18.2

 (PA-131875, from the Ballantyne collection is not a picture of the railway bridge but the foot and buggy bridge that was located to the north of the railway bridge).

On 12 August 1891 CAR locomotive No. 33 fell into the canal.  Two photos in the Public Archives depict this.  PA-127265 shows the preparations for raising the locomotive and PA-127267 shows a partially submerged CAR locomotive.  This is the Ottawa Citizen account:

A disastrous accident, which fortunately did not result in loss of life, occurred early yesterday morning at the C.A.R. depot.  An engine and three cars was in readiness to shunt on to a load of cars for the east and Fireman Page, without waiting for the engineer, started the engine and three cars for the swing bridge over the canal to shunt back.  At the same time, the tug Minnie Bell whistled for the bridge to open and Bridgemaster Wallace opened the bridge and signalled the approaching train.  Fireman Page seems not to have heard either the tug's whistle, the bridgemaster's shouts or to have seen the semaphore on the bridge until, on the verge of the opening, when he, too late, reversed his engine.  The train, however, had no chance to stop and the engine, tender and half the first car disappeared into the canal.  At once a rush was made to the spot, and no one expected to see Fireman Page alive.  He, however, had a miraculous escape, as he was pitched from the car and swam ashore suffering only slight shock.  The tug Minnie Bell was sufficiently far off to see the danger and slow up, and thus escape running under the train.  The blame of the accident rests with the fireman, who in the first place assumed the responsibility of starting the locomotive without the engineer, and secondly, had no occasion to run as far as the bridge to shunt his cars.  He has only been in the employ of the company about two years, and reported yesterday that he was suffering too much from chills and shock to attend the investigation.
The bridge was not damaged and traffic was not impeded.  The engine, no 33, was not damaged, but as it weighs 70 tons, the work of raising it will be an arduous and expensive one, and the loss to the company will be in the neighbourhood of $1,000.

See The Rideau Canal Accident

An article by Austin cross in the Ottawa Evening Citizen of 12 November 1948 sheds additional light on how the bell was donated to the Ascension Church but the date of the accident is way out.

'Cross Town by Austin Cross
For more than forty years now a railway bell has been calling faithful Anglicans to church.  What astonishes me is that I have been scooped on such a story for that church bell is right over my own Ottawa East.  How the church bell got from the bottom of the Rideau canal to the top of Ascension Church belfry is an interesting story.  This is one Lud Hawkins shouldn't miss.
One day, back about '04 or '05 before any lady working on the The Evening Citizen was born, Engineer Frank Turner of the old Canada Atlantic Railway was easing a train eastward from Bank Street toward the Rideau canal.  Handling the shovel was Fred Page.
As often happens, when an engineer has a good fireman, he lets the knight of the shovel take over.
"Take her over Fred." he said.
Those were the saddest words he ever said.  Fred took her over and started to wheel No. 33 toward the bridge.  She was a little old Rhode Island type.  Then, as now, there was a swing bridge, and the bridge opened to let traffic through.  There was a lot more water traffic then than now.
For what reason I know not, Fred ran C.A.R. No. 33 through the open bridge.  In a word, he put her in the drink.  No. 33 settled down calmly and quietly into the ooze and that was than.
I am not sure what happened to Frank Turner, but it was goodbye to the Canada Atlantic for Fred Page.  Mr Turner, incidentally, dead many years, had a son, Louis Turner, who worked for the Canadian National.
Meanwhile Fred Page got a job for the Ottawa Electric and ran on the street cars for Athearn and Soper for many years before he retired.  He is dead now.
The little Rhode island engine sat in the ooze for some time till the Canada Atlantic got the hook, and hauled her out.
At this time, somebody mentioned in Ascension Church that they were without a bell.
I got in touch with Mrs Ike Johnson, 137 Hawthorne, who is over 30, and who recalls the incident very well.  Rose Johnson said that when the matter of the bell came up. Joe Leslie, then people's warden at Ascension drew attention to the existence of this bell and said he thought he could get it.  It also happened that E.J. Chamberlain, who klater became president of the Grand Trunk which bought the Canada Atlantic, was the original general manager of the CAR.  The result was that it was an easy thing to get the train bell for the Anglican Church on Echo drive.
Old No. 33 has gone to that heaven of all engines, the scrap heap, a long long time ago.  But there's a touch of immortality about old 33 just the same.  For each Sunday the spirit of the little Rhode Islander rings out a message, calling the Ottawa east Agglicans to church.  As it ding dongs a message to the faithful, it conjures up a message to the old timers still alive.

There was a second accident at the drawbridge on 23 August 1907.  This time the locomotive did not finish up in the water:  This is the account from the Ottawa Journal:

Locomotive on rampage.

An unusual accident, luckily involving no loss of life, took place this morning shortly after 6 o'clock at Ottawa East.
Engine No. 451 backing west through the Grand Trunk yards to be attached to the regular daily way freight train going east, on reaching the drawbridge over the canal at Ottawa East, became unmanageable and started to back towards the river, instead of over the bridge.  The engine ran off the rails and travelled nearly the full length of the bridge on the ties, ripping and tearing them badly, and finally hung with its tender suspended over the waters of the canal.
The engineer - J. McKenna and fireman - G. Johnston, vainly attempted to check their engine.  The brakes seemed to be out of order and only after the application of both the air and emergency brakes was the mogul freight engine brought to a standstill.
The engineer and fireman both remained in their cab until relieved by personal orders of Mr. Donaldson, the G.T.R. general superintendent.
 
Three engines to the rescue.

No less than three huge engines were required to haul the runaway back to the metals, and in the meantime, for nearly two hours, traffic was at a standstill over the Grand Trunk tracks.
The back truck of engine No. 451are somewhat damaged, the tender is smashed and the underbody of both tender and engine are pretty well tangled up.
A large force of men was quickly put to work, the ties of the draw bridge were patched up and the damaged locomotive was towed to the repair shops.
Both engineer and fireman were badly shaken up and had to go home.
Various craft on the canal, including the steamer Rideau King, were delayed for an hour or so, being unable to get under the bridge until the engine was removed.

After one of the two incidents, the Grand Trunk (or CAR) donated the bell to the Holy Trinity Church.  Eventually it was replaced with chimes and the bell now calls the faithful of St. Augustine's Church in Newington to worship.

The drawbridge was replaced with a new deck plate girder swing span by the Grand Trunk Railway in January 1912.  This was authorized by Order in Council PC 1910-2386 and BRC orders 12752 of 13 January 1911 and 15838 of 24 January 1912.

The drawbridge was not originally interlocked and all trains were required to come to a full stop prior to passing over the structure during navigation season.  During the winter freeze up the bridge was secured across the Canal and trains were operated normally.  The stopping of westbound trains was particularly difficult, because it was often necessary to provide assisting engines to get full tonnage trains into the Bank StreetYard.  The turning of trains Nos. 1 and 2 entering or leaving Ottawa station involved a backup movement and, in one case, a head on movement in the other around the wye and up to or over this bridge.  In order to avoid these difficulties, as well as to reduce the smoke and noise nuisance in the navigation season, an interlocker was installed in 1940. This did not constitute a full interlocker inasmuch as there were no approach signals nor signals provided for movement out of the side tracks within the interlocker.  Due to the slow movement of all traffic over this drawbridge and being within yard limits, this did not create any difficulty and a speed limit of 10 mph. applied to all trains approaching the drawbridge.  A small cabin was constructed which contained a six lever frame (2 home signals, 2 derails and 2 bridge couplers, no spares) as follows:
 
1.    Signal for eastbound movements. 4.    Bridge coupler bridge lock.
2.    Eastbound derail - locked the main line switch normal. 5.    Westbound split point derail - when open this bolt-locked the main line switch normal.
3.    Bridge coupler power switch. 6.    Signal for westbound movements.

The derail on the east side was located just opposite the main line frog which was an unusual location but owing to the side track switch being so close to the main line frog, it was impossible to locate it otherwise without rearranging the track layout.


You can see the rodding from the interlocker, controlled from the cabin on the far right.  There are three rods on the bridge, one of which presumably controls the near-end lock (4 in the above list). Two rods continue through the box at the end of the abutment towards the lower left, presumably to control the approach signal and derail (1 and 2 in the above list). I wonder how power was fed to the mechanism at the centre of the bridge?Note also the ladder and catwalk, (for access to the machinery under the bridge?)  David Jeanes.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 32980 of 17 October 1922
CNOR authorized to use bridge over Rideau Canal without their first being brought to a stop: Providing the signals are clear and that trains shall not pass over the bridge and interlocking plant at a speed exceeding 15 mph.

This interlocker was authorized by order 59374 of 11 July 1940, the work was completed and brought into use by order 60695 of 12 May 1941. This remained in use during the navigation season until the line was abandoned.  

Ottawa Citizen 4 January 1963
Last Train
The last train is scheduled to cross the Rideau Canal on Jan. 13. thereby easing the traffic situation on Main Street and Echo Drive. The move is made possible by the new turning Y track in the Alta Vista area built by the CNR and CNR with money provided by three levels of government. Thus step by step railway relocation is proceeding according to plan, it makes possible a less costly Queensway and also opens the way to other projects of importance to the national capital.

The bridge was taken out of service on 3 February 1963 and handed over to the National Capital Commission the following day.
     


Ottawa, Riverside, CAR/GTR/CNR


Bill Linley picture.  March 1963.
Bruce Chapman comment: Riverside after the operators were eliminated and only the switchtenders remained at the west end of the bridge over the Rideau River. Hurdman would be at the far left.

Riverside tower (non interlocked) was located to the west of the Rideau River and is shown on plan X-2-216-6 of 23 Jan 1934 and  plan X-2-216-7 of 6 Jun 1941.  It seems it replaced the watchman's shanty which was set up in 1916 on the east side of the Rideau River to control movements to and from the interchange between the CNOR and GTR.  It controlled:
- both ends of the CNOR/GTR interchange tracks including the crossover at the CNOR end (Hurdman sub).  In the 1941 revision the double track was shortened and the switch at the Alexandria sub. end was included in the Hurdman interlocking;
- the switches to the double track and Ottawa Gas.

Riverside Junction still had a train order signal on the cabin in this picture. (Gone from the previous picture though there were two decommissioned signals).
The double signal mast for eastbound trains appears to have been electrically controlled with motors for the upper arms but fixed lower arms. I presume it was also controlled by the operator at Riverside, or was it controlled from Hurdman tower?

The north mast appears to be controlling the south main track (or both tracks), as it is clear for 6221. The south mast must have been for trains approaching from Bank Street, (on the track between 6221 and the signal)

From Bruce Chapman (February 2020)
I’m quite sure that the operator/switchtender at Riverside controlled the signals controlling movements off the Renfrew Subdivision and out of Ottawa Union, but I am just guessing, as when I worked at Hurdman, it was all CTC on the Alexandria and Beachburg Subdivisions once you got out of Hurdman.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 110200 of 24 January 1963
Authorizes CNR to make signal changes between Deep Cut and Riverside, m. 76.8, Alexandria sub.



Ottawa, Walkley Diamond

Board of Transport Commissioners order 82606 of 19 November 1953
(1) Authorizes CNR to operate through the interlocking at crossing of CPR and CNR Federal District Commission's connection from Hawthorne to Wass near m. 4.5 Prescott sub. provided all trains are brought to a stop at the governing home signal and then proceed on signal indication displayed;
(2) CPR authorized to operate through the interlocking without their being brought to a stop provided signals are in the PROCEED position.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 86625 of 22 July 1955
Authorizes CNR and CPR to operate through the interlocking at the crossing of CPR and CNR Federal District's connection, from Hawthorne to Wass, near m. 4.5 CPR Prescott sub. without their first being brought to a stop.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 104769 of 16 June 1961
CNR authorized to make signal changes to the Walkley interlocking.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 121544 of 2 August 1966
National Capital Commission (CNR & CPR) authorized to operate through the interlocking at the Walkley Diamond without their first being brought to a stop provided the signals are in the proceed position.



Renfrew Junction, K&P/CPR-OAPS/GTR/CNR 

No orders approving the original Renfrew Junction crossing  in 1893. It seems that the signalmen worked from the station, erected less than a year after the crossing was built. There was a connecting track.

Ottawa Journal 10 November 1893
There is a rumor that the K. & P.R. and the O.A. & P.S.R. may amalgamate to the extent of the K. & P.R. trains running into the new O.A. & P.S.R. station. A switch has been put in at the diamond on the town line at Kings. Renfrew Mercury. Also in Ottawa Citizen, same date.

Renfrew Mercury 12 October 1894
The K. & P.R. took its first passengers from the O.A. & P.S. new station at the diamond junction, about two miles from?, on Friday morning last. (Renfrew Junction was 1 mile west of Renfrew Station).

Board of Railway Commissioners order 55523 29 January 1938
Authorizes CPR and CNR to remove the station agent at Renfrew Junction.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 85234 of 23 December 1954
CNR authorized to remove the signals and signalmen at the crossing with CPR at Renfrew Junction and to install Stop Boards.

Board of Transport Commissioners order  87497 of 29 November 1955
CNR authorized to dismantle and remove the station building and platform at Renfrew Junction, m. 55.23.


Rockland, CNoR/CNR-GTR/CNR


Bytown Railway Society Carriere Collection
In constructing its Hawkesbury to Ottawa line, the Canadian Northern Ontario Railway had to cross the Grand Trunk Rockland branch extension to the Edwards Mill.  The crossing was authorized by order 2031 of November 1906 and the Board authorized temporary operation, for one month during construction, by order 5569 of 3 November 1908.  With no prospect of operation during the winter of 1908-09, a three month extension to the construction order was issued on 3 December 1908 by order 5749.  The CNOR only needed to use the crossing during this period to bring in materials for the construction of the Greens Creek bridge but the Grand Trunk Superintendent, Donaldson, made it difficult and had to be instructed to obey the board order.  A further extension of time for temporary construction was obtained through order 6551 on 18 March 1909.

An interlocker was installed but it failed its first inspection because the mechanism was stiff, one of the signals on the GTR was poorly sighted and because of a twisted stock rail.  The angle of this crossing was very acute (9 46') and a moving point frog had to be used rather than a more normal diamond.  The changes required by the Board were carried but then there were problems with high water on the Ottawa River so that the work could not be inspected and a further temporary extension was required (22 May 1909 order 7058).  The operating order, 7621, was issued on 24 July 1909.  CNOR trains were required to slow down to 15 mph.

The interlocking, constructed by Union Switch and Signal, was lever locked rather than latch locked.  The signal cabin was on the north side of the crossing and the machine, a half interlocking because there were no derails or distant signals, contained six levers.  The moveable frogs were fitted up with 50 ft. long detector bars.  The lever were as follows:
 
1 GTR southbound home signal 380 ft. from crossing.
There was no number five
2 CNOR westbound home signal 800 ft. from crossing. 6  GTR northbound home signal 800 ft. from crossing.
3 Moveable frog. 7 CNOR eastbound home signal 800 ft. from crossing.
4 Facing point lock bar.

The use of the crossing of the  GTR spur to Edwards Mill was particularly light with no night traffic and only an occasional daylight movement.  On 16 March 1915 by order 23418 the railways were relieved from providing a signalman to operate the crossing; home signals and derails were to be set clear for the CNOR and the key to the tower was left in the custody of, and the interlocking plant to be operated by, the crew of the GTR.  This situation did not last for long as 24910 rescinded this arrangement on 19 April 1916.

Even so the interlocking did not last very long.  With the amalgamation of both CNOR and GTR into CNR there was a move to rationalize duplicate facilities and the interlocking was replaced by plain switches. An air photo from 1927 (A47-22 and 23) clearly shows that the crossing and tower had been removed and replaced by a switch.  The Edwards Mill extension had been removed north of the CNOR with access being provided from the spur at the west end of the Rockland siding.  It also appears that the switch was not at the location of the former crossing, but in fact, at the west end of the Rockland siding after running alongside the CNOR main line for a distance. There certainly appears to be new fill and ballast along the right of way between the former crossing and the siding.  

The Rockland to Clarence Creek section of the former GTR Rockland branch was abandoned on 30 June 1936, while the entire line between Ottawa, Hurdman, and Hawkesbury was abandoned on July 10 1939.



Smiths Falls CPR-CNR

Canadian Transport Commission order R-38337 of 15 July 1985
CPR authorized to install an interlocking at the junction of the Smiths Falls sub and the Winchester sub. in Smiths Falls.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-39017 of 29 January 1986
CPR authorized to operate its trains and engines through the interlocking at the junction of the Winchester and Brockville subs. without first bringing them to a STOP provided the signals are in the PROCEED position.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-36326 of 2 March 1984
CNR authorized to abandon Smiths Falls sub. from m. 35.30, Smiths Falls to m. 99.30, Strathcona effective 30 Jun 1984.  CNR to continue operations between m. 13.0 and m. 35.3.




Smiths Falls, CNoR/CNR bridge over the Rideau Canal


Privy Council order PC 1911-1626 of 19 July 1911
Plan for a bridge over Rideau Canal at Smiths Falls. The original plan, approved by Order in Council on 25 May 1910, was a double arm swing span and the Canadian Northern Ontario Railway has now submitted a revised plan substituting a Schwarzer rolling lift span of 60' clear, the site, however, remains the same. The revised plan is approved. 
As the railway will cross Lock Island, on the western end of which many boat houses etc. are located, to reach which the owners will have to cross the railway track, the lease shall contain a provision that the Company shall construct and maintain a crossing for road vehicles over their proposed railway on Lock Island.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 15187 of  20 October 1911
With the approval of the GIC, CNoR authorized to construct a bridge across the Rideau River and Rideau Canal at Smiths Falls.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 15723 of 30 December 1911
CNoR authorized to consrtuct a bridge over the Rideau Canal at Smiths Falls, m. 40.8 from Ottawa.  Rescinds 15187.

Chesterville Record 7 September 1912
Mr. James Carr, bridge inspector for the CNR arrived in Smiths Falls on Saturday to arrange for the construction of the bridge over the Rideau river there.  The bridge, which is to be built at this point, is of the type known as the Scherzer Roller Lift, and as yet there are only two of the kind in Canada.  It is expected that the work will be commenced at once.

Chesterville Record  19 September 1912
The life (sic) span of the new CNR bridge which is being built at Smiths Falls it (sic) to be 57 feet wide and the total weight of the bridge on the centre pier is 270 tons.  The centre balance weight made of concrete will weigh about 150 tons.  When the bridge is in place this counterweight will be about 50 feet above the rails.  it will be worked by an electric motor, but will also be furnished with hand power equipment.
The construction of the bridge is causing great interest.

Brockville Recorder 20 September 1912
A New Lift Bridge Across the Rideau - Constructed by the Canadian Northern Railway - Third of it’s kind to be constructed in Canada
(Rideau Record.)
An important piece of work in connection with the building of the Canadian Northern Railway line through here is the new bridge across the Rideau River above Jones’ Lock. During the winter the big cement piers to carry the structure were made and now the men are here to erect the bridge. The work will be watched with considerable interest, as the bridge is to be of an entirely new design. It is known as a Scherzer, designed and patented by the Scherzer Bridge Co., of Toronto, and will be sent here in sections so accurately made and fitted that it will go together without the sound of saw or hammer. There are only two other bridges of the kind in Canada, one at Montreal and one for the C.N.R. at Salmon River. It works on the principal of the child’s rocking horse and is plainly shown in the accompanying cuts. The first shows the bridge in the act of being lifted. The second shows what it will be like when it is up to permit boats to pass. The lift span is 57 feet wide, and the total weight of the bridge on the center pier when the bridge is in motion is 270 tons. The counter balance weight, made of concrete will weigh about 130 tons. When the bridge is in place this counter weight will be about 30 feet above the rails, as the rails when the bridge is up. This will serve as a guard for trains when up. The width of the bridge will be 171/2 feet. It will be worked by an electric motor, but will also be furnished with power equipment, and will be so evenly balanced and so perfectly made that a man will be able to lift it with one hand. Operated by electricity, everything will be done automatically, signal lights changed according to the position of the bridge without touching them. About 25 men will be employed and it is expected that it will take from four to five months to complete the work of erecting. Mr. T. Riley will be in charge for the Foundry Company. Mr. James Carr, bridge inspector for the C.N.R. is here just now getting the work started.

Perth Courier 20 September 1912
The new steel bridge the Canadian Northern is erecting at Smiths Falls is called a Sherzer, and is the third to be erected in Canada, one at Montreal and the other at Salmon Arm B.C. It works on the principal of a child’s rocking horse. The lift span is 57 feet long and the total weight of the bridge on the center pier when the bridge is in motion is 270 tons. The center balance weight made of concrete will weigh about 150 tons. When the bridge is in place this counter weight will be about 30 feet above the rail, as the bridge is lifted the counterweight comes down until it rests on the rails when the bridge is up. This will serve to grand for trains. The width of the bridge will be 171/2 feet. It will be worked by an elected motor but will also be furnished with power equipment and will be evenly balanced and so perfectly made that a man will be able to lift it with one hand. Operating by electricity, everything will be done automatically, signal lights changed according to the position of the bridge without touching it

Ottawa Journal 20 March 1913
Track laying on the Canadian Northern between Toronto and Ottawa is nearly completed, Mr. S.M. Montgomery, C.N.R. ticket agent, told the Journal this morning.
"Yes, the bridge over the Rideau is finished," he said, "All the bridge work is finished, and all that remains to be done, with the exception of ballasting, is a few miles of track laying.
- - -

Board of Railway Commissioners order 32980 of 17 October 1922
CNoR authorized to operate over the new interlocking plant installed at the crossing of the Rideau Canal at Smiths Falls.
CNoR authorized to use bridge over Rideau Canal without their first being brought to a stop: Providing the signals are clear and that trains shall not pass over the bridge and interlocking plant at a speed exceeding 15 mph.

Eastern Ontario Review 20 October 1922
Electric power is about to replace man power in the operation of the Canadian national lift bridge on the Rideau at Smith Falls. One advantage will be a distinct saving in time.

Eastern Ontario Review 10 November 1922

The Department of Railways and Canals is preparing to proceed with the construction of a new steel bridge over the canal at Smiths Falls. Concrete retaining walls are also to be built in the basin there during the winter

Privy Council order PC 1931-2499 of 15 October 1931
Renews lease of CNR bridge over Rideau Canal at Smiths Falls on the same terms as originally authorized by order in council of 25 May 1910, namely $10.00 per year for 21 years.

Canadian Transport Commission order R-24864 of 26 May 1977
CNR authorised to remove interlocking of the Rideau Canal drawbridge at m. 35.50 Smiths Falls sub and install stop signs.



Tichborne K&P/CPR-CLO&WR/CPR 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 16490 of 9 May 1912
CLO&WR authorized to construct cross K&P at m. 24.8 from Glen Tay:
(1) CLO&WR shall insert a diamond in the K&P under supervision of a K&P engineer;
(2) Crossing be protected by an interlocking plant, derails and home and distant signals to be placed on the lines of both companies on both sides of the crossing, derails to be interlocked with signals;
(3) normal position of signals on both lines to be at danger, and in the movement of trains of the same or of a superior class, K&P trains to have priority;
(4) plans to be approved by an engineer of the Board;
(5) Man or men in charge of interlocking to be apponted by the K&P;
(6) CLO&W to bear cost of providing, operation and maintenance of the interlocking.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 21031 of 15 December 1913

CLO&W authorized temporarily, pending the installation of interlocking required by 16490, to operate its trains over the corssing with the K&P at m. 24.8 from Glen Tay.  Trains of both companies to be brought to a stop and flagged over the diamond.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 33641 of 8 May 1923
Approves plan showing proposed automatic signal protection as intended to be rearranged at Tichborne in substitution for the existing diamond crossing with protection by interlocking.



Vankleek Hill,  GTR/CNR-CPR

Privy Council Railway CommitteeOrder of  21 December 1896
Approves of the place and crossing of the CAR, Hawkesbury branch, by the M&O at Vankleek Hill on the following conditions:
- M&O shall provide, construct and thereafter maintain at the point of crossing an interlocking, derailing and signalling system and all the necessary works and appliances for properly operating the same.
- To be approved by the Chief Engineer of Railways and Canals before said crossing is used for traffic, this approval being subject to the agreement between the two parties dated 24 Nov 1896 in so far as they affect the arrangements to be made for the safety of the public and the working of traffic and are not inconsistent with the Railway Act, or this order or any other order which may be made in respect of said crossing.

Ottawa Journal 20 May 1898
At Vankleek Hill the C.A.R. is crossed and at this point the interlocking plant is used, which permits the trains to cross without stopping.  The signals are so arranged that accidents are practically impossible. East of St. Eugene, 40 miles from Montreal, the train's speed was 59 miles an hour. 

Board of Railway Commissioners order 32459 of 1 June 1922
So long as the character of the movements over the crossing shown to exist continues, CPR and  GTR relieved from maintaining a signalman between 22:00 and 06:00 daily and from 06:00 to 22:00 Sundays; the home signals and derails to be set for the GTR (sic) and the key of the tower to be left in the custody of the GTR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 32484 of 9 June 1922
32459 amended so that derails and signals set clear for the CPR and key retained by CPR.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 46929 of  26 June 1931
Approves CPR plan showing proposed instllation of automatic signals and the question of the installation of derails at the said crossing be reserved for further consideration.

Board of Railway Commissioners order 47288 of  31 August 1931
Amends 46929 by striking the words "and the question of the installation of derails at the said crossing be reserved for further consideration".

Board of Transport Commissioners order 60937 of 9 July 1941
1 - Approves revised plan X-2-214/5 showing installation of automatic signals at the crossing of CNR by the CPR at Vankleek Hill.
2 - Entire cost to be borne by CPR.
3 - Al trains approaching the crossing between the distant signals and the home signals on the CNR shall be limited to a speed not exceeding 20 mph.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 61121 of  21 August 1941
Authorizes CPR and CNR to operate their trains over the crossing at Vankleek Hill without their first being brought to a stop, provided the signals are in a "proceed' position.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 78883 of 5 May 1952
Approves plan showing changes to signals at interlocking plant at crossing of CPR and CNR at Vankleek Hill.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 89184 of 9 July 1956
Authorizes CPR to make changes to the interlocker at Vankleek Hill.

Board of Transport Commissioners order 91405 of 16 April 1957
Authorizes CPR to operate its passenger trains over crossing with CNR at a speed not exceeding 50 mph.


This page updated 27 March 2020

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